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Full text of "The Rainbow 1934"

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Augusta College 


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DF.IDICATION 

TO 
f y. JEENJEST WIASON ALLIEN 



In apppecialion ot his loLjallL) to out' 
schools: oT his skill as a Teacher; ol his inviiluahit 
work in sTudenl allairs: especicillij as cpealop ol 
the vr7ola Ix rlonoi OocIcIlj and as v^oach 
of the rAcadcmi) declaimeps; ol his iinsellish and 
hiqhli) ctTicienl services To the sludenl hodij; ot 
his admipable qualities ot chopactep and pcpsun- 
alitij — the otiident Dodies oT the Junior (^olleqe 
oT rXuqusta arul I he r\caclcnu| ot I- ichniond 
v_^ountq dedicate this issue ot I he Kainbow 
To rip. Lpnest IVIason /Allen. 



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Ernest Mason Allen 





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George Phineas Butler — A Characterization 
One never feels his inadequacy so much as when he stands in the presence of a great 
Christian personage and attempts to sum up the qualities and virtues of his full-orbed life. The 
late Dr. George P. Butler was more than a school administrator, more than a teacher, more 
than a lover of youth. His interests knew no narrow professional bounds, but were as wide 
as the far horizons of Christian service and civic duty. I offer Wordsworth's "Character of 
The Happy Warrior" as the best characterization of the great soul whose memory we revere. 



"Who is the happy Warrior?" 

"He labors good on good to fi.x, and owes 

To virtue every triumph that he knows: 

Who, if he rise to station of command. 

Rises by open means; and there will stand 

On honorable terms, or else retire, 

And in himself possess his own desire; 

Who comprehends his trust, and to the same 

Keeps faithful with a singleness of aim; 

And therefore does not stoop, nor lie in wait 

For wealth, or honors, or for worldly state; 

Whom they must follow; on whose head must fall, 

Like showers of manna, if they come at all: 

Whose powers shed round him in the common strife, 

Or mild concerns of ordinary life, 

A constant influence, a peculiar grace; 

But who, if he be called upon to face 

Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined 

Great issues, good or bad for human kind, 

Is happy as a lover; and attired 

With sudden brightness, like a man inspired;" 

"This is the happy Warrior; this is he 
That every man in arms should wish to be." 





President 



L. Skixxek 



In this copy of the RAIXBOW will be found many pages whicli will, in years to come, 
bring back to your mind sweet and fond memories of your school days at Old Richmond and 
at Junior College. As you turn these pages now, and also in later life, may I remind you 
to think of the significance of the title of this book, "The Rainbow" — a symbol of promise, 
with its five dominant colors, Red, Yellow, Green, Blue and \"iolet: blended by God into a match- 
less creation of beauty. 

In your life, may tlie Red be indicative of your Youthful X'igor, your Enthusiasm, your 
Knergy, your Self-Confidence; may the Yellow indicate your Worth, your Strength of character, 
your Stability; may the Green represent your continued Growth, your physical, mental and 
moral Development; may the Blue stand for your Dependability and your Truth; while the Violet 
will represent the sweet fragrance of your Love and your Service to your fellowmen. Then let 
all of these attributes be blended into a matchless creation of a beautiful LIFE, and you will then 
have been true to the principles of your Alma Mater. 







^I^^%> 




Dean Eric 
Fellow-Students: 

The two greatest questions that youth ever 
"What is success??" 

The sublimest, and at the same time most 
that you are a co-worker with God in doing the 
you to make your proper contribution to the 
ment and redemption, and to come to the end 
to record here my formula for success. 

The only power that will ever redeem the 
character. HE WHO WOULD ACHIEVE 
BE. Through constant communion between the 
prehend the rule of right, the symmetries of 
And as we recognize that these are not mere 
known among the stars, life's vocation becomes 



\V. Hakuy 

asks are these: "Is there a formula for success?" 

challenging conception that can come to you, is 
unfinished work of the world. If success means to 
ongoing of the Divine process of social better- 
with clean hands and a pure heart, thvrn I dare 

world from error is the power of brains and 
SUCCESS MUST NOT ONLY KNOW, BUT 

Divine and the human mind, we come to corn- 
character, and the requirements of perfection. 

provincialisms of this planet, but that they are 
clear, and we rise to the full dignity of man. 

Faithfully vours, 

ERIC W. HARDY. 





Board Of Trustees 

Bryan Gumming President 

Landon Thomas J 'ice President 

Warren Bothwell Secretary and Treasurer 

John Phiniz_v E. C. B. Danforth. Jr. 

Ferdinand Phinizy W. Montgomery Harrison 

Officers Of Board Of Education 

Freeman C. McClure President 

Frank R. Miles J 'ice President 

Dr. Lawton B. Evans Sec. and Sitpf. of Schools 



ia 



I 



High School and Junior College Committee 



Mrs. R. C. Bailie, Chairman 
Mr. H. L. Murphey 
jMr. R. F. Moore 



Mrs. John \\\ Walker 
Mr. J. E. Dicks 
Mr. J. T. Fender 





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Mrs. J. E. Eubanks 

Secretary 

Graduate Cecil Business College, 1916; Office. Spartanburg Herald. 1916; 
Bank of Spartanburg. 1917; Office, Collector of Internal Revenue, Columbia, 
1918-1919; Secretary to Pastor, 1st Presbyterian Church. Augusta, Ga., 1919- 
1921; Secretary, A. R. C, 1921-1926; Secretary and Registrar, A. R. C.-J. C. 
A. 1926-1934. 





Julia A. Fliscii, A. i\J.. adviser of women 
History 
Graduate of Lucy Cobb Institute; A.M. (Honorary) Uniyersity of Georgia, 
1899; Graduate Student, Harvard Uniyersity, one summer session; University' 
of Chic '.go, three summer sessions; University of V^irginia Summer School, 
1931; A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1908; Teacher, Georgia Normal and 
Industrial College, 1893-1905; Executive Clerk, Extension Division, Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1905-1907; Secretary, Economics Department, Uniyersity 
of W^isconsin, 1907-1908; Teacher, Tubman High School, 1908-1926; Teacher, 
Universit}' of Georgia Summer Session, 1905, 1912. 1913, 1923; The Junior 
College of Augusta, 1926. 



Katharine P. Boggs, B. S. 

Education 

Graduate of Birmingham Normal Training School; B. S., Columbia 
University, 1920; Special Diploma, "Supervisor in Training Schools," 
Columbia Uniyersity, 1920; Graduate Student, Columbia University, one 
summer session; University of Georgia, one summer session; Director 
Training School for Teachers, Augusta, Ga.; Instructor in University of 
Tennessee Summer School, 1921-1922-1923; The Junior College of Augusta, 
1926. 



Ernest Mason Allen, Ph. B. 

English — French 

Ph. B., Emory University, 1926; Student Instructor in I'Vench at Emory, 
1925-1926; A. R. C, 1926. 



Justin A. H. Begue, B. S., B. A. 

French 

B. S., B. A., Paris Uniyersity, 1907; Instructor in Mathematics and Modern 
Languages, Cairo (Egypt) College; Modern L:<nguages, College of Quimper 
(France), 1913-1914; Modern Languages, College Leconte de Lisle, 1917-1920; 
Senior High School, Mahanoy City, Pa., 1921-1923; Academy of Richmond 
County, 1923-1926; The Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 



G. L. Bolton 
Alath and Science 





B. S., I mory University, 1926; Cuthbert High School, 1926-1927; 
Jesup High School, 1928-1930; A. k. C, 1930-. 



Principal 






Charles Guy Cordle, A. B., 
History and German 

A. B., Trinity College (Duke University), 1914; A. M., Trinity College, 1915; 
Summer School, Columbia University, 1917; Summer School, Emory Univer- 
sity, 1930; Student Assistant in Latin, Trinity College, 1913-1915; Graduate 
Assistant in German, Trinity College, 1914-1915; Instructor, Baird's School 
for Boys, 1915-1916; Instructor, Academy of Richmond County, 1916-1926; 
Director. Summer School, The Junior College of Augusta, 1931 and 1932; 
Head of History Department, Academy of Richmond County, 1922-1926; The 
Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 



George AI. Dasi^.er 
Shot" 

Graduate of A. R. C; Teacher of Carpentry in Richmond County Schools; 
A. R. C, 1924-. 



Charles Martin Etheredge, A. R. 
EiujUsh and Math 

A. B., Newberry College, 1923; Principal, Waverly Consolidated High 
School, Waverly, Ga., 1923-1924; Turbeville High School, Turbeville, S, C; 
Superintendent, Cope High School, 1924-1926; A. R. C, 1927-. 



Martin D. Young, B. S., M. S. 
Biology 

B. S., Emory University, 1931; M.S., Emory University, 1932; University 
Fellow, Emory University, 1931-32, sustituting for J. M. Ellis, on leave; The 
Junior College of Augusta, 1932-33, 1933-34; Marine Biological Laboratory, 
Wards Hale, Mass., Summer 1933. 








A. B., Wofford College, 1916; A. M., Wofford College, 1916; A. M., Co- 
lumbia Universit)-, 1927; American Academy in Rome, Summer 1929; 
Instructor Textile Industry Institute, Spartanburg, S. C, 1915; Instructor, 
Acidemic High School, Columbus, Ga., 1916-1917; on leave of absence for 
graduate work, at Columbia University, session 1932-1933; Academy of 
Richmond County, 1919-1926; The Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 



Norman L. Galloway, B. S., M. A. 

Education and Economics 

Student Union University, Jackson, Tenn., 1919; Western Kentucky State 
Teachers' College, 1922; Superintendent of School, Farmington, Ky., 1922-26; 
B. S.. Murray State Teachers' College, 1927; Supervisor of Rural Schools, 
McCracken County, Kv., 1926-27; Supervisor Rural Schools, Graves County, 
Ky.. 1927-28-29: M. A.. George Peabody College for Teachers, 1929; 
Instructor Summer College, Junior College of Augusta, 1929; Superintendent 
of Schools, La Center, Ky., 1929-30; Instructor, The Junior College of 
Augusta, 1930. 







Robert Emil Gressette 
History 
A. B., University of South Carolina, 1931; A. R. C. 



Luther Alfred Griffin, B. S. A., M. S. 

Botany 

B. S. A., University of Georgia, 1922; M.S., University of Michigan, 1931; 
Science Instructor, Waycross High School, 1922-1923; Head of Science 
Department, Waycross High School, 1923-1925; Science Instructor, Citrus 
County (Florida'i High School, 1926; Science Instructor, Marietta High 
School. 1926-1927; Science Instructor, Academy of Richmond County, 1927- 
1932: The Junior College of Augusta, 1932. 




fe_ 






John Thomas Hains, B. S. in Education 

Mathematics 

Graduate, Ac.demj' of Richmond County, 1910 and 1911, B. S., Education 
University of Georgia, 1915; Graduate Student, University of Georgia, 1920- 
1921. also during one summer session; Instructor Albany High School, 
Albanj', Georgia, 1915-1917; Comandant of Corps of Cadets and Instructor, 
Athens High School, 1920-1922; Superintendent, Swainsboro, Ga., 1922-1923; 
Commandant of Corps of Cadets, Academy of Richmond County, 1923-1926; 
Instructor, Academy of Richmond County, 1923; The Junior College of 
Augusta. 



William Redding Ivennedy 
Commercial 

Georgia Normal College, 1904; Zanerian College, Columbus, Ohio, 1908; 
Professor, South Georgia College, 1906-1909; Rome High School, 1912-1913; 
Extension Work at Georgia, 1931-1933; A. R. C, 1913-. 



£ 






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B. S., Commerce, University of Georgia, 1927; Summer Graduate Work, 
University of Georgia, 1932: Fourth District A. M., Carrollton. Ga., 1927- 
193o; A. R. C. 



William Lerov Maden, A. B.. A. M. 
French 



A. B., Tusculum College, 1926; Assistant Principal St. James High School, 
Greenville, Tennessee, 1926; Principal, St. James High School, 1927-1928; 
Graduate Student. Duke University, 1928-1929; A. M. Duke University, 1930; 
The Junior College of Augusta, 1930. 



Anton Paul Markert. B. S. in C. E., M. A. 

Mathematics and Draiving 

B. S.. in C. E. Georgia School of Technology, 1921; M. .A.. Columbia 
University 1929; Graduate Student, University of Cliicago, summer 1925; 
Instructor, Academy of Richmond County, 1921-1926; The Junior College 
of Augusta, 1926. 




Charles Harold Mitchell, A. B., M. A. 
English and Education 
A. B. University of Pittsburgh, 1918; M. A.. University of Pittsburgh, 1931; 
Holder of Honor Scholarship, University of Pittsburgh, 1914-18; Cadet Cap- 
tain and Assistant in Instruction, R.O.T.C., University of Pittsburgh, 1917-18; 
Second Lieutenant, Field Artillery, U. S. Army, 1918; Cross of Service, U. D. 
C, 1926; Graduate Student, Harv.rd University, one semester. 1922-23; 
Graduate Student, Summer School, University of Pittsburgh, 1926-29, 1931; 
Graduate Student. Summer School, Duke University, 1933; Instructor, Aca- 
demy of Richmond County Summer School. 1930-31; Instructor, Academy of 
Richmond County, 1920-; The Junior College of Augusta, 1928-. 

John Bcirchell Moore 

English 

Washington and Lee LTniversitv. 1912-14; Universitv of South Carolina, 
1915-16; U. S. A., World War, 1916-19; Bachelor of Arts, LTniversity of South 
Carolina, 1927; Master of Arts. Universitv of South Carolina, 1932; Frank- 
lin High School, Kerr, N. C, 1922-25; University of South Carolina, 1926-27; 
Colegio de San Pablo, Camagiiev. Cuba, 1927-28; Ocoee High, Ocoee, Fla., 
1928-29; A. R. C, 1929-34. 



J. George McDonald. Ph. B.. C. P. A. 

Mathematics 

Ph. B.. Emory University. 1915; Principal, Greensboro High School. 
1915-16; Lakeland (Fla.) High School, 1916-18; Kentucky Military Institute, 
1918-20; A. R. C, 1920-. 







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David Franklin McDowell, A. B.. A. M. 

Spanish 

A. B., University of Florida, 1924; A. M., University of Florida. 1928; Sum- 
mer School, University of North Carolina, 1929-30-31; Traveled in Spain, 
summer of 1932; Teaching Fellow, University of North Carolina, 1930-31; 
Teacher, Lake City, Fla., High School, 1924-25; Teacher, Miami, Fla., High 
School. 1926-27; Teacher, John Gorrie Jr. High School, Jacksonville, Fla., 
1928-29-30; Instructor in French and Spanish, Extension Division, University 
of Florida, 1928-29, 1929-30; The Junior College of Augusta, 1931. 



Auburn G. Owens, A. B. 
English — History 




m 



A. B., University of Georgia, 1925; Graduate Student, University of Georgia, 
1925-26; Instructor, Waynesboro High School, 1925-28; Summer School, 
Columbia University, 1929-30; A. R. C, 1928-. 



Henry Osgood Read, Ph. B.. A. M. 
English 

Ph. B.. Emory University, 1916; A.M., Emory University, 1918; A.M., 
Columbia University, 1925; Special Diploma. "Supervisor of English," Colum- 
bia University, 1925; Graduate Work, University of California, 1931; Fellow 
in English, Emorv University, 1916-1917; Head of English, Emorv University 
Academy. 1917-1918; Principal. Dawson. (Georgia) High School, 1919-21; 
Superintendent. Dawson Public Schools, 1921-1922; Head of English Depart- 
ment, Academy of Richmond County, 1922; Head of Department of 
English. The Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 




George H. Ridgway. A. B. 

Chcmistr\< 

A. B., University of Georgia, 1923; Head of Science Department, Pensacola 
High School, Pensacola. Fla.; Mathematics Department. Gainesville High 
School. Gainesville. G-..; A. R. C. 1927-. 







Joe I\Iays Robertson. B. S. 

Civics, English, Mathematics 

B. S., Clemson College; Graduate Student, Duke University; Principal and 
Instructor, Public Schools of Pickens County, S. C, 1921-25; Superintendent 
of Schools, Saluda, S. C, 1925-28; A. R. C, 1928-. 



C. A. Royston 

B. S., University of Georgia, 1922; Ila High School, 1922-25; Louisville 
High School, 1923-24; Marietta High School, 1924-26; Cordele High School, 
1926-27; Gainesville High School, 1927-29; Richmond Academy, 1929-. 








George Milton Scott. A. B.. B. Lit. 
English 

A. B., Univer.sity of Chattanooga, 1922; B. Lit. in Journalism. Columbia 
University. 1926: Summer School, Columbia. 1923-1920; Summer School, 
Duke University. 1932-1933; A. R. C, 1922-24, 1926; The Junior College of 
Augusta, 1933-. 



Chester .\. Scrl'ggs. A. B.. A. M. 

Chemistry 

\ B Mercer University, 1911; Graduate Student. University of Chicago. 
Sumnie'r Qmrters, 1925-26; A.M.. Columbia University, 1930; Principal, 
Marshallville High School. 1911-13; Principal, Round Oak High School, 1913- 
1916; Principal, Ashburn High School, 1916-17; Instructor, .Academy of 
Richmond Countv, 1917-26; Director, Summer School, Academy of Richmond 
Countv, 1918-24;'The Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 



Robert Haves ^""herman 

Mathematics 

University of Pensylvania, Civil Engineering, 1913 to 1919; United States 
Geographical Survey, 1919, 1920; Faculty, The Academy of Richmond County, 
1920-21; 1921-22; Civil Engineer, Lawrence & Smith Construction Engineers, 
1023-26; Civil Engineer. Claussen-Lawrence Construction Co., 1926-32. The 
Junior College of Augusta, 1932. 



Albert F. Simpson. A. B. 

History — Ciz'ics 

A. B., D'.vidson College. 1925; Graduate Student. University of Georgia, 
1925-26; Instructor, Washington (Ga.) High School, 1926-27; A. R. C, 1927- 
30; Director of Athletics. A. R. C.-J. C. A.. 1930-. 







Chester McKenley Sutton. A. B.. A. M. 
English 
A. B., Guilford College, 1918; A. B., Haverford College, 1919; A. M.. Univer- 
sity of Nortli Carolina, 1924; Graduate Study, University of North Carolina, 
Summer of 1925. year of 1925-26; Duke University Sunmier School. 1931; 
Principal Manteo High Scliool, 1919-20; Principal, Bona \'ista High School, 
1920-22; Principal. Leggett High School, 1922-23: Principal. Mount Pleasant 
High Scliool, 1924-25: Instructor in English, LTniversity of North Carolini, 
1925-26; Head of Department of English, Piedmont College Summer Scliool 
of 1926; The Junior College of Augusta, 1926, 



Joseph Le Conte Tai.lev, B. S.. M. S. 

Physics 

B. S., LIniversity of Georgia. 1923; M.S.. Mercer University, 1925; Graduate 
Asssitant in Physics and Mathematics, Mercer University, 1923-24: Columbia 
University Summer School, 1927: Instructor in Physics, Mathematics and 
Drafting, Mercer University, 1924-25; Head of Physics in Mercer University 
Summer School, teaching Phvsics and Radio, 1926: The Junior College of 
Augusta, 1926. 







Robert Jackson Bates Smith 
President 

An army officer — a quick conimand — a boisterous laugh — 
Beech Island. 

Class President 2; Cadet Captain 1; Lieut. Ool. 2; Capt'iin Rifle 
Team 1: Rifle Team 2; Winner of cup for best drilled company 
in Freshman Battalion 1; Winner of Gen. Leonard Wood Medal 
for School Rifle Team 1: Hi-Y 1, 2; Vice President Hi-Y 1; 
President Hi-Y (both terms) 2; Sec.-Treas. Student Council 2; 
Military Editor of Rainbow 2. 



Katherixe Sherwood Bishop 
rice President 
An October day — crowds cheering — white sails. 
Editor-in-Chief of Rainbow 2; Vice-President of Sophomore 
Cl-.ss 2; Cheer Leader 2: High Honor 1; High Honor 2; Basket- 
ball 1 and 2; Captain of Basketball Team 2; Tennis Runnner-up 1; 
Hi-Y-W 2; Phi Theta Kappa. 

John Calhoun Stephens, Jr. 
Secretary 

A crowded stadium — a wooly overcoat — a yell from Jernigan — 
then a sixty-yard run. Wow! 

Cadet Captain 1; Cadet Major 2; Officers' Club 2; Class 
Treasurer 1; Class Secretary 2; Managing Editor Musketeer 2: 
StafT of Rainbow 2; Hi-Y 1, 2; Vice-President of Hi-Y 2; Football 
Letter 1, 2,; Coach Company Football 1, 2; Interclass Basketball 
(Hi-Y) 2: J. C. A. Athletic Club 2; President Student Council 2. 



Alex Rennie Kelly 
Treasurer 
A high silk hat — a cross-word puzzle — a boiler factory. 
Musketeer Staff 2; Rho-Chi 2; High Honor 1; Phi Theta Kappa. 



Elizabeth Lockhart Lee 
Student Council 
A Congresswoman — a March wind — a Red Cross nurse. 
Literary Society 1 and 2; Vice-President of Literary Society 2; 
Glee Club 1 and 2; Student Council 2; High Honor 1;' Hi-Y-W 2; 
Basketball 1: Phi Theta Kappa. 



i 



i 



Grace Allgood 
Sunset — a peaceful stroll — the rustling of leaves. 





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Thomas Edwaru Bailey 

Clever hands — a microscope — success. 

Sec.-Treas. Literary Society 2; Rho-Chi 1, 2; President Rho-Chi 
2; Sec. Treas. of Chemistry Club 1; Battey Memorial Contestant 
1; Company Football 1; Winner of Battey Memorial Contest 2. 



Emma Ruth Bark.sdale 
An old-fashioned garden — a maiden of the 90's gathering 
arkspur. 
Glee Club 1; Hi-Y-W 2. 



Milton Cook Barwick 

A charge to the jury — blue golf socks — Lawrence Tibbett. 

Literary Society 2; Glee Club 2; Hi-Y 2; Basketball 1; Inter- 
Class Basketball (Hi-Y Team) 2; Basketball Letter 1 ; J. C. A. 
Athletic Club 2. 



LoTLSE Barbot Battey 
A saucy hat — a red riding jacket — a country clul). 
Literary Society. 



Richard Edgar Black 
Mr. Talley's inspiration — perpetual motion "Camel Walk" — dry 
humor. 



Sarah Louise Blackstone 
A cap and a gown — a well-kept office — a blue dress with white 
cuffs. 

Honor 1 and 2; Phi Theta Kappa; Glee Club. 








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\\'iLLiAM Butler Blandenburg 
A hard-boiled sergeant — a T-model Ford — a farm. 



Lester Bohler 
A little white cottage — climbing roses — a pink gingham dress. 



Julius Hill Bolgla 

A sportsman — a scholar — a doctor. 

Junior College Literary Society; Rho-Chi Pre-Medical Society: 
German Club — Honor 1; Basketball Letter 1; Inter-Class Basket- 
ball (Rho-Chi Team) 2; J. C. A. Athletic Club 2. 



Theolu Briggs 
A gypsy camp — tambourines — a camp-fire. 



Alvin Brisendine 
A boxer — a humorist — Qualitative Analysis. 



Emily Dv Mont Brown 
Tourists — ocean liners — European cafe — bizarre surroundings- 
chartreuse. 






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Sarah Miot Brown 
White canvas shoes — a Y.W.C.A. — a fruit slir wcr. 




Maridx Harvey Currie 

A little boy dressed in blue — a crooked smile — a toy gas bal- 
loon (inventcr of Currie's liquid air machnie.) 

Literary Society 1 and 2; President of Literary Society 1 and 2; 
Debating Team 1: Oratorical Contest (second place) 1; Oratorical 
Contest (first place) 2; State Oratorical Contest (first place) 2. 



Alice Elizabeth Daniel 
Early morning — a skylark — a white violet. 
Glee Club 1 and 2; Basketball 1; Literary Society 1. 



Frank Scranton Doremus 
A dance hall — bright lights — an orchestra leader. 
Glee Club 2. 



JuANiTA Edwards 
A crowded gym — purple and white lassies — a tip-off. 
Basketball 1 and 2: Alternate Captain of Basketball Team 2. 



Anne Lewis Eargle 
An infectious giggle — a Fifth Avenue dress shop — a popular 
dance hit. 




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Du BosE Egleston, Jr. 

A tennis racket — a handsome trophy — a sweatshirt- 
grin. 

Rho-Chi Pre-Medical Society 1 and 2; Treasurer of Pre-Medical 
Society 2; Chemistry Club 1; Hi-Y 1 and 2; Football 1 and 2; 
Basketball 1; Inter-Class Basketball (Hi-Y team) 2; Tennis Team 
1; J. C. A. Athletic Club 2; Company Football Coach. 



Henry Prontaut Eve 
A tin soldier — a pretty little impish boy — a cherry smash. 
First Lieutenant 2; Officers' Club 2; Honor 1. 



William Anthony Eaughnan 
An early morning paper route — a tan slip-over sweater- 
happ}'-go-Iucky smile. 



Lloyd Thomas Eolsom 
A statesman — a humorist — Mr. Reed's inspiration. 



Myrtle Ruth Fooshe 
A finger-wave — a "black cliff" — the "Carioca." 



Thomas Edward Eulghum 
Medicine, chemicals (especially explosive ones.) He wants to 
know what happens. 

Vice-President of Rho-Chi Pre-Medical Society 2. 



4 







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^1 










Glee Club 1 and 2; Literary Society 2; Hi-Y 2; Basketball 1 
and 2. 




Frank Mallette Gradv, Jr. 
A starry niglit — a telescope — a quiet mathematician. 

High Honor 1: Phi Tlieta Kappa. 



James Verdery Greexe 
A football field — a fraternity man — a radio technician. 

Literarj' Society 1 and 2; Rho-Chi 1 and 2; Chemical Club 1 
and 2; German Club 1 and 2; Football 1 and 2; Captain Football 
Team 2; Basketball 1: Inter-Class Basketball 2. 



Alton Rebecca Guest 
A Mickey Mouse comedy — a quiet bottle of pop, then off goes 
the top — watch the bubbles dance! 

Literary Society 2; Hi-Y 1 and 2; Basketball 1 and 2. 



Martha Elizabeth Hardin 
Jonquils — blue china — a summer rain. 



Ruth Hardman 
Cold crystals — white lilies — a prima donna. 

Glee Club 1 and 2. 





Martha Eva Harris 
A June day — a blossoming meadow — a lace umbrella. 



JUANITA BaRTZ HaYNIE 
A skating rink — a tan beret — a textbook. 

High Honor. 



Agnes Cecelia Heffernan 
A tedd}^ bear — an intercepted pass — a pleasing lisp. 

Glee Club 1 and 2; Literary Society 1; Basketball 1 and 2. 




Joshua LeRoy Holley 
Mathematics, Chemistr}', Physics — an engineer. 



Mary Lyon Hull 

A heart flutter — a romantic sigh — sparkling eyes. 
Literary Society 2; Hi-Y-W 1 and2; Honor 1. 



John Emile Hummel 
A blue streak — a flip, missed — a laugh within a laugh. 

Rho-Chi Pre-Medical Club 1 and 2; Hi-Y 1 and 2; Golf Team 
1; Football 2; Inter-Class Basketball (Hi-Y team) 2. 





Literary Society 2; Glee Club 1: Honor 1; Hi-Y-\V 2; Phi 
Theta Kappa. 



Helen Kessel 
A miniature — lavender and old lace — "Love's Old Sweet Song." 

High Honor; Glee Club, 



Nelle Ramsey Legwen 
Marble terraces — crushed orchids — suede gloves — a Persian cat. 

Literarv Society 2; Honor 1; Hi-Y-W 1 and 2. 








Kathryn Cash Leipold 
Jewels on dark velvet — oleanders — a smart hat. 

Literary Society 1 and 2; President of Glee Club 1; Honor 1; 
Hi-Y-W 1 and 2; Secretary of Hi-Y-W 2: Literary Editor of 
Rainbow 2. 



.^ 




Tracy Levy 

An explosion — a big laugh, followed by an expression of inno- 
cence — then an alibi to Mr. Scruggs. 

Literary Society 2; Rho-Chi 1 and 2: Chemistry Club 1; Sales 
Manager of Rainbow; Football 1; Company Football 1. 



Francis Xavier Mulherin, Jr. 
A golfer — an all-around sportsman — a smooth, harmonic dancer. 

J. C. A. Literary Societj' 1 and 2; Rho-Chi 1 and 2; Assistant 
Business Manager Musketeer 2; Vice-Pres. J. C. Science Club 1; 
Winner Golf Tournament 2; Runner-up Golf Tournament 1; 
Runner-up Tenis Tournev 2; Golf Team 1 and 2; Inter-Class 
Basketball (Rho-Chi) 2; Hi-Y 1 and 2; Picture Editor of Rain- 
bow 2, 



1^ 



Richard William Mulherin 
Golf knickers — a big leather golf bag — an Irish wise-crack. 

T. C. A. Golf Team 1. 




Elinor Vivian McGahee 
Much-a-do about nothing — a talking doll tightly wound — Doro- 
thy Dix. 

Glee Club 1 and 2: Basketball 1; Tennis Tournament 1 and 2. 




Anne Cordelia McLendon 
Grovetown — green shrubbery — a school teacher. 





Donald Roswell AIcRae, Jr. 
A mountain camp — a cold stream — a bugle call. 

Literary Society 1 and 2: Football 2; Inter-Class Basketball 
(Lunch Room) 2; Hi-Y 2. 




Cornelius Francis O'Shea 
An Irish grin — a shamrock — Hall of Fame. 

Highest Honor I; Phi Theta Kappa 2. 



Lois Partridge 
.\n orange sweater — a Brenau scholarship — a doctor's secre- 
tary. 



Lindsay James Powell 
Hallelujah — Ebenezer — a fisher of men. 

Literary Society I and 2: Glee Cluli 1 and 2; High Honor I; 
Battev Memorial Contestant. 



Katrine Rawls 
An operating room — low voices — rubber gloves. 

High Honor 1; Hi-Y-\V 2; Phi Theta Kappa. 




Veda Maydell Reville 
Pink rose petals — a rock garden — a soft voice. 





^E^^. 






' 



La Vern Alexander Russell, Jr. 

A turtle-neck sweater — a rhythmic waltz — a wizard in Gov- 
ernment. 



Thomas Lonergan Saul 

A "King Bird" — a tennis racket — a golf club. 

Hi-Y 2; Golf Team 1 and 2; Inter-Class Baskteball (Hi-Y) 2; 
Runner-up in Doubles Tennis Tourney 1. 



Geneva Elizabeth Sheridan 

A successful revival meeting — a fisher of humanity — salvation. 
Literary Society 1; Glee Club 1 and 2; Basketball 1. 



Zachariah Sweeney Sikes, Jr. 

Snakes, lizzards, squalas, acanthius. (You can't charm women 
and snakes alike, so you had better stick to snakes, Sikes.) 



Frank Henry Steeling, III 

An expert swimmer — an efficient diver — a loyal booster of the 
Alma Mater. 

Literary Society 1 and 2; Rho-Chi 2: German Club 2; Inter- 
class Basketball (Demons) 2. 



Elizabeth Ramsey Storey 
Bright-red lipstick — floppy hats — "Well, Ho-ney;'' 
Honor 1. 



i 





gX^^ 




Dorothy Eugenia Symms 

An Alpine pass — an Englisli dog — sport oxfords. 

Literary Society 1 and 2; Glee Club 1 and 2; Honor 1: Hi-Y-W 
2: Basketball 1. 



Richard Johxsox Wade 
A black pipe — a soap-box orator — penants waving on a foot- 
ball field. 

Cadet Col. 1 and 2; Glee Club 1 and 2: Business Manager Glee 
Club 2: Honor 1: Musketeer Staff 1 and 2. 



Vaughn James Warthex 
.\ "fair-fat friend" — ducks — Mr. Talley's Pbysics. 
Rho-Chi 2: Inter-class Basketball (Pre-med.l 2. 



Margaret Josephine ^^^^TKINS 
.\ dark green riding habit — a loaded Chevrolet — admiring 
friends. 

Glee Club 1: Basketball 1 and 2. 



Frances \\'heeless 
A music studio — "Big Broadcast" — Bing! 

Glee Club 1 and 2. 



Ann Carolyn White 
.\ jumping jack — a red stick of peppermint candy — Cab Callo- 
way. 

Literary Society 2; Glee Club 1 and 2: Higliest Honor 1; Phi 
Theta Kappa. 



V 
4 





il 




Marie Jordan Whitney 
Horse races — a nionacle on a black ribbon — a winter tourist. 



Anne Leitner Wiggins 
The tang of salt air — a surf-board — foam-capped waves. 
Glee Club 1 and 2: Basketball 1. 



James Harvey Wilson, Jr. 
Test tubes — chemistry formulas — test papers. 
Glee Club 1 and 2: High Honor 1. 



JoNNiE Mae Witt 
A valedictory address — a walking encyclopedia — a modest 



violet. 



Literary Society 2; Highest Honor 1 and 2; Hi-Y 2: Basket- 
ball 1 and 2: Phi Theta Kappa. 



Elsie Geraldine Woodward 
A victorious novel — sunflowers. 

Honor 1 ; Training School. 



Homer Gordon Young, Jr. 
An exclusive night club — a speedometer going up — ladies' man. 

Football 1 and 2; Football Letter 2; Inter-class Basketball 
(Demons) 2. 



i 



i 




11 



H 






N' 




CLASS PEOPHI 

SOPHOMORE CLASS J. C. A. 



Last Wednesday afternoon we went up to Mr. Scruggs' laboratory with the intention 
of performing one of our experiments. The room was filled with apparatus which was 
connected in a weird fashion, all criss-crossed with electric wires. Sparks, feet in length, 
were shooting about the room. In the midst of all this conglomeration we became excited 
and started out to call the fire department, but just at this moment Mr. Scruggs called us. 
We looked around; and beliold, there before our eyes was an unbelievable sight. Mr. 
Scruggs was over in the far corner of the laboratory behind a large glass retort, applying 
a flame to it, while the contents were lioiling and sending forth a steam into the long 
chain of apparatus. 

Mr. Scruggs explained to us, that a week ago he read "Doctor Heidegger's Experi- 
ment," and marveled at how' the doctor had made a chemical which was capable of 
restoring youth. He explained, however, that his chemial would produce an opposite 
effect, he believed. After taking it, people would be aljle to see far into the future. We 
walked over to the end of the apparatus where the liquid was collecting in a bottle. He 
said that no one had used the liquid so far, but that he would like for someone to try it. 
I immediately volunteered my services. I drank about an ounce of the ghastly liquid and 
like a Hash of lightning I was thrown into a trance. I was carried in my dreamy visions 
to the year 1954, where I visioned all the mendjers of the class of 1934 in their different 
stations of life. 

Grace Allgood, Louise Blackstone, and Ruth Hardman are teachers of some reputa- 
tion at John Milledge School. 

Ed Bailey and Tracy Levy are the leading surgeons of Augusta. They prefer using 
carbon monoxide instead of ether in their operations, because they say it is less painful 
They haven't had a patient to complain yet. 

Emma Ruth Barksdale and Eva Harris are happily married. They attribute their 
successes to the psychology they learned from Air. Galloway. 

Katherine Bishop has employed Cook Barwick as her permanent "cook." He seems 
to have been very successful. 

.\gnes Heflfernan is basketball coach at J. C. A. "Mickey" Edwards is her assistant. 
The girls at J. C. A. seem to be very successful under the coaching of these girls. They 
have won the Pumpkin Center championship two years in succession. 

Louise Battey and Ruth Jones are traveling in Europe, broadening their education 
by travel and adventure. 

■'Bill" Blandenberg is a corporal in the army. They say he is very proud of his high 
command. 

Julius Bolgia and Tom Fulghum have built up a very reputable medical practice in 
Hamburg, S. C. 

Frank Grady is a professor of mathematics at West Point. 

Rebecca Guest ow-ns a great interest in a certain adding machine company. 

Jimmie Greene is football coach at McBean L^niversity. 

Martha Hardin is still trying to find her ideal mate. 

Myrtle Fooshe has taken Mrs. Eubanks' place in the office. She calls every absentee's 
home. Wonder if she calls anyone else? 

Marion Currie is a great student of chemistry. He is still working with Mr. Scruggs, 
trying to persuade him that vou don't have to perform experiments to get results in the 
lab. 

Job Clark recently came out of his silence, and declared that he had found the 
fourth dimension. 

Theolu Briggs is professor of Chinese at Gracewood. 

Miriam Fullbright is director of athletics at Tubman. 

Were you alarmed when you heard that Katherine Leipold and Katrine Rawls had 
discovered a new chemical substance? After working for over three years, they came 
across nitro-ethyl-di-phenyl ?amina-hydroxy-benzyl acetate. 

Mina Lee Rubenstein has devised a new eighteen day diet. She says there is no 
reason why she cannot have a figure like Mahatma Ghandi if she resorts to his system. 



I 



i 




ir^ 



M 



i 



of fasting. 

Neal O'Shea has taken Einstein's place in the world of science. He has found the 
fourtli dimension that Einstein looked for so long. 

Roswell McRae, James Powell, and Harry Jackson are world travellers. They re- 
cently made a l)icycle trip to Winnepeg, Canada: They recently visited Henry Eve and 
\'aughn Warthcn who live near the South Pole. These two fellows live in Iceberg. 

Ale.x Kelley and Emile Hummel have discovered a new type of motor fuel that has 
tended to increase the sale of automobiles. You use the fuel once and then you have 
to buy a new automobile. 

You would be surprised to see Margaret Merry now. When w-e left J. C. A., she 
was a wee little girl, but now she is a full grown lady. 

Elizabeth Lee has accomplished something in life. She has learned to speak French 
perfectly. 

X'ivian AIcGahee and Juanita Haynie recently plaj-ed for the women's nationa 
tennis championship. 

Harry Dawson and DuBose Egleston are doing research work on top of Pike's Peak. 

Frank Dorenius has taken Bing Crosby's place in the movies. 

Mary Tutt Love and Roberta Ingle have entered the great sea of matrimony. 

Nelle Legwen is a society columnist for the New York Times. 

Elizabeth Daniel has crashed the movies. They say she won the contract formerly 
held by Ann Harding. 

Sarah Brown is a successful teacher. Many are the students she has kept on the 
right path. 

Billy Faughnan is a successful business man. He owns an ice cream stand at East 
Boundary. It is said that his business is so successful that you can have an ice creiam 
cone delivered to the aviation field for five cents. 

Lester Bohler and Ann McLendon are members of the furniture department of a 
large department store in Hamburg. S. C. 

Mary Hull and Lois Partridge are models for painters. They have become quite 
popular with the reading public as their pictures appear on the fronts of magazines 
very often. 

Leroy Holley just recently completed a new skyscraper building for Augusta. 

Elizabeth Hutchinson, Helen Kessel, and Dorothy Huntington have just finished 
writing a book on why children should be better. 

Frank and Dick ilulherin are golf professionals at the Hepzibah national golf 
course. They have as their caddy master. Alvin Brisendine. 

Keene Hammond has become quite a seaman. He owns a boat line operating be- 
tween Augusta and Hamburg, S. C. 

Harriet Reed and Carolyn White are competing for the title of Miss America. 

Jonnie Mae Witt and Harvey Wilson are professors of chemistry at J. C. A. 

Marie Whitney and Eugenia Svmms recently completed a book on the life of Mr. 
Read. 

Geneva Sheridan ow-ns a tabernacle which is located at East Boundary. "Toots" 
has become quite an evangelist. 

Sweeney is operating^ a snake exhibit in Johnnie J. Jones carnival. 

Bates Smith and Carswell W'illiams are the tiddle wink champions of Augusta. 

Frances Wheeless, Geraldine Woodward, and Ellen Trigg are office girls in the 
hardware store of Saggus, Saggus & Saggus, Inc. 

.Dick Wade is now a mess sergeant in the army. 

L. .•\. Russell has taken Clark Gable's place in the movies. 

Frank Stellings is a professor at Medical College. 

Veda Reville and Elizabeth Storey are successful teachers. We understand that 
they are quite proficient in their psychological methods. 

Anne Wiggins is singing for the Chicago Opera company. 

Josephine Watkins is a chemist of some note. She recently demonstrated to Mr. 
Scruggs that an atom was not an atom at all, but something we talk about and never see. 

Lloy4 Folsom is a city councilman. Some day he might be President, who knows? 

Frank Hardman is playing in a jazz orchestra. 

Tom Saul is a successful cotton broker. 

James Watkins is owner of the Augusta Herald. 

Richard Black liked the old Alma Mater so well that he is back teaching physics. 
^Ir. Talley lost his mind explaining to Black. 

Believe It or Not, 

ED BAILEY. 






THOUGHT TH\^ VJA5> A FiLUNa STATlOf/*" 



freshmen ^. O. 6j. 




Bell 


Anderson 


BOSTICK 


Daley 


Fair 


Willis 


Ballentine 


Bryson 


Daniel 


Forney 


IVEY 


Barnard 


Caver 


Doyle 


Fournace 


Dunbar 


Bell 


Cheek 


Dye 


Franklin 


Harbin 


Bell 


Clark 


Epps 


Franklin 


Andrews 


BoECKMAN 


CORLEY 


Ellis 


Fuller 





Goldberg 


Hallman 


Hildebrandt 


Jackson 


Kelli- 


Gercke 


Hardy 


Holley 


J A M ES 


Kennedy 


GiLLMAN 


HARPp- 


Holland 


Iernican 


Krafka 


Gracey 


Harrell 
Harris 


Hook 


Joe 


Linson 


Graham 


Howard 


Johnson 


Lombard 


Halford 


Harrison 


IVEY 


Jordan 


Levkoff 





Marks 


McAuLLIFFE 


Pritchard 


Roesel 


T AFT 


Mattison 


NOWELL 


PUNARO 


R'JSSELL 


Trimble 


IMavo 


Ogilvie 


PUNARO 


Russell * 


\\'lLDER 


AIeurer 


OUTZ 


Quar:.es 


Sanford 


Wiley 


MiZE 


Pardue 


Uat^orn 


Stallings 


WORSHAM 


^luLCAY 


Pendleton 


^•Iedd 


St-phens 


Wynn 



^ 




EOS T i~ E 

lfEtSI[l,MArt CLASS 1934 

J. C. Bell President 

Sam Zealey I "uc President 

Mary Willis Seerctary 

Glen Ivey Treasurer 

Henry Harbin Coiineil 

\\ . R. DuxBAR Coitneil 



Acton, Billy 
Andrews, Philomena 
Anderson, Dorothy 
Asserson, Bowen 
Armstrong, Philip 
Ballentine, Frank 
Barnard, Helen 
Barrentine, Fee 
Beane, William 
Beard, Gordon 
Beaufort, Bill 
Bell, John C. 
Bell, lohn R. 
Bell, Lois 

Bennett, Wm. Albert 
Boeckman, Anna 
Bostick, Elizabeth 
Bridges, Otis 
Brown, Emily 
Bryson, Campbell 
Caver, Mary 
Cheek, Phoebe 
Clark, Chauncey 
Cofer, Charles 
Corley, Augustus 
Corley, Grady 
Cosgrove. Harry Hill 
Culley, Larry 
Daley, Charles 
Daniel, Hinton 
Daniel, Ricliard 
Davison, Davenport 
Doyle, John 
Delph, Preston 
Dunbar, Wallace 
Dunbar, William 
Dye, Grace 
Eargle, Annie Lewis 
Epps, Jewellen 
Ellis, Frank 
Fleming, Claude 



Forney, Kenneth 
I'ournace, Louise 
Franklin, Wilhelmina 
Franklin, Le\'ale 
Fulcher, Henry Grady 
G^rcke, Annette 
Gilchrist, James 
Gillnian. Hannah 
Goldberg, Margaret 
Goss, Ruth 
Graybill, Robert 
Gracey, Judith 
Graham, Laun 
Halford, Richard 
Hallman, Frances 
Hamilton, F'red 
Harbin, Henry 
Hardy, Charles 
Harper, Walker 
Harrell, Sarah 
Harris, Ruth 
Harrison, Edith W. 
Fulghum, Hardy 
Fuller, George 
Fair, Jane 
Herman, Marion 
Hildebrandt, William 
Holley, Katlierine 
Holland, Mary 
Howard, Carl 

Hook, Beverley 
Howard, Charles 
Hynes, Anne 
Ivey, W. C. 
Ivey, Glenn 
Jackson, Julia 
James, Miriam 
Jernigan, Margaret 
Joe, Frances 
Joe, William 



Johnson, Eleanor 
Joplin. Wm. 
Jordan, Jessie 
Kelly, Dorothy 
Kenn.edj-, Mary 
Key, Ronella 
Krafka, Katherine 
Lake, George 
Linson, Mary 
Lombard, Elna 
Levkoff, Doris 
Lucky, Milton 
Maddox, Howard 
Marks, Joel B. 
Marshall, Hugh 
Maryott, Arthur 
Mattison, Ida Lee 
Mayo, Elizabeth 
Meurer, Mary 
Mize, Hamby 
Mulcay, Mary 
McAuliffe, Rogers 
McLin, Marvin 
Neal, F'rank 
Nowell, Dean 
Nowell, Dorroh 
Ogilvie, Alex 
Ouzts, Helen 
Pardue, Margie 
Pilcher, John 
Pierce, Frank 
Pritchard, Paul 
Punaro, Angelo 
Punaro, Itala 
Quarles, Vivian 
Raborn, Harry 
Redd, Peggy 
Roesel, Albert 
Rogers, Elizabeth 
Russell, Richard 



Russell, Maurine 
Saggus, Harold 
Sanford, Mary Dell 
Shanahan, Ellen 
Shelton, James Roy 
Silver, David 
Smith, Edwin Studley 
Stafford, Luther 
Steed. William A. 
Steffan, Dorothy 
Stelling, Emily 
Stephens, Virginia 
Stulb, Henry 
Swint, Wm. Lawrence 
Taft, Josephine 
Trimble, \'irginia 
LTsry, \'an 
Weeks, Gertrude 
Wilder. Martha 
Wiley, George 
Willis, Mary 
Worsham Virginia 
Wren, Henry 
Wynn. Read 
Young, Homer 
Yearly, John C. 
Zealy. Samuel H. 

Irregular Students 

Harmon, Wallace 
Matthews, P'red 
Pendleton, Allen 

Post-Graduates 

Henson, Margaret L. 
Bryngleson, Sarah 
Forney, Frances 
White, Audrey 
Ryan. W. James 
Gilison. Katherine 



^> 



I 






Lieutenant 4; Winner Tennis Tournament 2; Winner of Tennis 
Doubles, 3; Basketball 2, 3 and 4; Football 3 and 4; President 
Junior Class; President Senior Class; Student Council 4. 

It has always seemed apparent that "C. A." would be a natural 
leader. Whether on the basketball or football team, he has fought 
to the best of his ability to win glory and fame for the dear old 
A.R.C. What rould have been more appropriate than to have this 
boy reach the h;ghc:st student office, president of the senior class? 

B. E. Pierce 

Football, '30, '31, '32: Track, '32; Vice Pres. Junior Class; Vice 
Pres. Senior Class; Student Council '34; Hi-Y, '33. 

Ben is very popular among his classmates, and has a host of 
friends. He has been active in athletics, having been a member of 
the track and football teams. We nearly lost him last year when 
he hooked a forty-pound channel bass. Ben tried to hold on, even 
though the bass headed for China. 

Charlie P. Coleman 

High Honor 1 and 2; Highest Honor 3 and 4; Captain 4; 
Academy Literary Society 1, 2, 3; Pres. 2; Glee Club 3 and 4; 
Track Team 3; Sec'y of Senior Class 4; Editor in Chief of Mus- 
keteer; Gold "R" 3. 

Charlie's attractive personality and knack of making friends 
have made him one of the most popular boj's in his class. While 
making Highest Honor in his school work, he has proved himself 
an able editor of our "Musketeer." Due to his marked intelligence 
and strong character, we shall look forward to hearing of Char- 
lie's success in later life. 

David Samuel Daley, Jr. 

Captain '34; Member Saber Club; Football letter '32, '33 and '34; 
Co. Football '30; Basketball letter '33 and '34; Captain team '34; 
Trek Squad '33 and '34; Treasurer, Senior Class '34; Stu- 
dent Council '33; Glee Club '32; Rich. Hi-Y '33 and '34; Pres. Hi-Y 
'34; Freshman Literary Society '30; Gold "R." 

Enthusiasm — that is a synonym for David. No matter what he 
undertakes, he comes through with flying colors. David was voted 
"most athletic" and "best all-round Senior." Certainly he is a star 
with the faculty of old A.R.C. Lucky will be the college whose 
doors he enters. 



Lloyd Adams 

Football Team; Sergeant in R.O.T.C. 

We wonder what Mr. Scott's class in journalism would be like if 
there w'eren't a few "wise cracks" made by Lloyd. Lloyd is a 
hard worker and is sergeant in the military department. 



J. A. Baggs 

Sergeant '34: Track Team '31; Assistant Manager Basketball 
team '34. 

Buggs! Ah! God's gift to women! His curly hair and smooth 
line have won him many a feminine heart. Though he likes to 
play, we know he will reach the top. 











Charles J. Bailev 
Sergeant 4: Corporal 1: Rifle Team. Company B 4; Basketball 



Ririe ranges and basketball interest Cbarles most — bis 
there has kept him from his studies quite often. 



George C. Bl.-\nch.\rd 




3 Year course in 4 years, High Honors -. 1st. and 2nd. years 
Second Lieutenant. Freshman Literary Society 1. 

George lias surely set a record for himself by running the 
[iresent \'aledictorian a close second. George's happiest mo- 
ments are spent asking Mr. Talley deep questions. A glance at 
his report card will prove the theory, "To ask questions is to store 
up knowledge." It is useless to predict him a bright future for 
\\ e know it would be impossible to be otherwise. 



S. Blum 

Sergeant '34; Basketball 4. 

Everybody knows "Blinky" Blum, our basketball player. He 
has done some nice work on .our team this year. Besides this, 
Blum has attained the rank of sergeant in our military department. 



L. A. Bryant 

High honor 1st. and 2nd. semester Rifle team 3 and 4. 

.Mthough Junior has not had time to grind away at his books 
on account of a next-door attraction, he has kept pace with his 
class and has accumulated numerous friends of both sexes. He is 
certainly a straight shooter, hi proof thereof, he is wearing a medal 
for lielping his team win in tlie rifle matches. 



Robert Edward Barton 

Corporal in Band '32; Sergeant in Band '33; 1st Lieutenant in 
Band '34; Literary Society. 

We don't see how the band will get along ne.xt year without 
Lieut. Barton, for he has spent four years there. We won- 
der why he wears tlie letters "Oat" on his jacket. 



[.\CK BOL'SAKU 



Sergeant. 



Jack is one of our best "drummer boys." He has been rattling 
a drum in our band for some time, having attained the rank of 
sergeant. Not only our band, but our school, will lose a valuable 
iiKiiiber and student when Jack is graduated. 




J. Brown 

Honor 3: Sergeant 3; 2nd Lieutenant 4; Rifle tear 

During his sojourn in the Academy, Brown has made numerous 
friends. He is striving hard for his diploma, and we wish him 
the hest of luck. 





Hampton Bryson 

High Honor 1; Honor 2 and 3; Lieutenant 4; Academy Literary 
Society 2 and 3; Treasurer 4; Member Glee Club 3; Letter in 
Basketball 3 and 4; Sports Editor Annual 4; Student Council 1; 
Richmond Hi-Y 3; Treasurer 4; Gold "R" 3. 

Hampton is the sort of fellow who takes part in all school 
activities: Basketball, football, Glee Club. Hi-Y, and Literary So- 
ciety — he's there with the goods. While keeping his best foot 
forward in all the above, he has proved himself a successful 
sports editor of the "Rainbow." 

H. BuRGAMY 

Football '33; Sergeant '32. 

Old "Jew Boy" Herman was popular among the football 
players. This year, he played some good football, but he had to 
play on the "B" varsity a couple of' years to get good enough. 
We almost lost him this year with pneumonia, but he pulled 
through. 



A. Calhoun 



Sergeant. 



"A. B." is one of the boys who work while going to school. 
He is not the bookworm type, but has succeeded in never failing 
a course while at A. R. C. 



V. Caseli^a 



Sergeant 2 years. 



jj0^ 



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Uf^ 

^■^ - 



^fk.. 



"Vick" is the kind of bo5' who says little but thinks much. 
Although he is little, we believe he will make a good "soda- 
jerker" just the same. 



Vernon R. Cawley 
Fast Class; High Honor 1 and 2; Sergeant Company M. 

"DEPENDABLE" — what word could better describe Vernon! 
He holds a place of high esteem in the minds of all his class- 
mates. Only "A's" dare show themselves on his report card. 



1 





a 








H. B. Chandler 
2nd Lieutenant 4; Band 1 through 4: Literary Society '31 and 
'32 Secretary Literary Society '31; Track Team '33: Delsating 
Team '32 and '33; Winner Debating Cup '32. 

Harold is the guy with the big drum in the band. He is also 
the man for argument in the Senior class, having won the debat- 
ing cup in '32. He has just been made a 2nd Lieutenant and a 
member of the Sabre Club. 

Marion Nesbit Dasher 
Honor 2; 1st Lieutenant 4 (band): Literary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Secretary Literary Society 2, 4: Glee Club 1. 2, 3, 4. School Or- 
chestra 4: Sabre Club 4; \'ice President of Class 2; Hi-Y 3 and 4. 

Dasher is the little guy with a heart about as big as he is, 
which is saying a great deal. He is popular among the students 
and active in the school activities, being one of the foremost 
members of our band. Boy! Ada must be some inspiration. 

Willis Parrish Denny 
Honor 1 and 2; Sergeant 3; 2nd Lieutenant 4: Rifle Team Cap- 
tain, Company E 4: Company Football 3 and 4: Member of 
Sabre Club 4. 

Willis is a member of our class whom we can rightly feel 
proud of. He is a member of his company rifle team; and because 
of his fine work in the military department, he received his com- 
mission this year. 



A. F. Dixon 
Sergeant. 

"A. F." is of the Romeo type, with his curly lilack hair. We 
are sure he will win some little "dove's" Iieart. Best of luck to vou. 



Sam Berry Durden 

1st Sergeant; Football 2 years and company football; Track 
4 years, captain 2 years; Rifle Team; Basketball; Student Council; 
Vice President Hi-Y. 

Sam is one of our foremost track stars. He is a fellow who 
can show a mean gallop when on the track. Besides track, Sam 
has also been active in other forms of athletics and student activi- 
ties. He is a boy who is a favorite among his classmates and 
friends. 






1 



* 




W. H. D. Dunn 



Lieutenant. 



Dave is a quiet boy, but his cherry smile is always present. 
He is sincere in everything he attempts to do. We wish you luck 
and know you will prosper. 




S 




Corporal 3; Sergeant 4: Academy Literary Society 2 and 3; 
Company football 3: Track team 1, 2, 3. 

Pardon us folks, but this is a mistake. We are sorry we let 
Charles' picture become mixed with the Senior group, but he has 
already assured us that he doesn't mind being in such distinguish- 
ed company. 




B. Forney 

4 year course in 3 years; Honor 2; Student Council 1; Corporal 
2; Top Sergeant 3; Glee Club 1 and 2. 

From our latest reports Forney is going in for duck-raising in 
a big way. Nevertheless, his work "along this line" does not keep 
him from his other tasks, as he is always up in his school work. 



Leonard Garten 

Highest Honor 1 and 2; Sergeant 3; Lieutenant 3; Secretary 
and Treasurer of Literary Society 1; 4 year course in 3 years; 
Valedictorian of Class; Academy Literary Society 3. 



T^ 



1\ 



CLEAR The Stage! CURTAIN! Behold the VALEDIC- 
TORIAN of the class of '34! It is with great pride that we are 
able to have such a student in our group. Garten has set a high 
standard for himself and is living up to it 100%. We know that 
the word "success" will be the password in whatever he undertakes. 



J. Good 

Honors 2 and 3; Sergeant; Rifle Team, Company G. 

Though small in stature, Joe has convinced everyone of the 
enormity of his mind. He is another of the few who managed to 
bore out the bull's eye in the company rifle match. It is useless 
to prophesy Joe a successful future, for it is recognized that a 
good man cannot be kept down. 

Robert B. Gracey 

Lieutenant 4; Rifle Team 4; Literary Society 1; President 2, 3 
and 4; Class Treasurer 1; Student Council 2; Debating Team 2; 
Secretary, Jr. Hi-Y 2; Academy Hi-Y 3rd (Sec. 4); Glee Club 3; 
Contestant for Declaimer's Cup 3; Assistant Business Manager 
of Annual 4. 

A glance at Robert's list of honors will show that there is 
nothing he cannot do and do well. Add to his ability his cheerful 
nature, unselfish disposition, his power to influence, and you have 
one of the finest boys in the A. R. C. 

Thomas Treutlen Grady 
Honor 1; Vice Pres. Literary Society 1; Corporal 2; Sergeant 3; 
Company football 1; Letter in Football 2 and 3; Vice Pres. of 
Class 2; \'ice Pres. Hi-Y 3; President of class 1. 

Athletic Grady, we're proud of you 
We marvel at the things you do. 
You win success with the ladies too! 
Thirty-four's best old sport, Here's toyou; 
May you win your race in life 
As you have in football strife. 






J. HUNGERPILLER 

Fast Class; High Honor 1; Honor 2; Sergeant, Company B. 

Jim is well known to all because of his monstrous name. It 
never fails to create a titter when announced in chapel. . . 



ever, this does not worry Jim. We hope we live to see him make 
that long name of his famous. 

George Thomas Hughes 

Sergeant, 3 and 4. 

"Husky's" pleasant personality and ever-present smile have 
attracted to him a large number of friends. He has decided to 
follow the career of a lawyer. Husky, here's wishing you a 
large clientele and success in pleading every case. 

Llewellyn Hutto 
High Honor 1. 2 and 3; Lieutenant 4. 



It was in the fall of 1930 that the A. R. C. received a very note- 
worthy addition. This addition came in the form of "Lei." Besides 
Ijeing very popular with his classmates, he has trained his report 
card to exhibit only "A's." 



V 



John Coleman Jordan 

Sergeant 2; Football 1; Company Rifle Team. 

Jack's good nature has won hnn a place in the hearts of all of 
his classmates. He was one of the valued members of Royston's 
Ramblers, and plays tennis and golf. 



Donald Fraser Kirkpatrick, Jr. 

Honors 1 and 2; 1st Lieutenant 4; \'ice President, Secretary- 
Treasurer of Literary Society; Glee Club 4: Debating team 2; 
Band 1, 2 ,3, and 4; Richmond Hi-Y 3 and 4- 

We don't know what's been wrong with Kirk lately, but thej' 
say her name is "Pud." We are sure of one thing though, and that 
is the fact that it is not the scenery on Russell Street that holds 
such an attraction for him. 

William C. Kitchens 

Honor 2 and 3; Sergeant 4; Football Company 2; \'ice Pres. 
Literary Society 2; Glee Club 4; Literary Society 1, 2, 3 and 4; 
Track 3; Company Rifle Team 4; Letter in Football 4. 

Bill is a great fellow with a pleasing personality. Since he lias 
been with us, he has been very active in school activities and 
athletics. He is a good player on the football team and was award- 
ed his letter this year. 




ii 



Si 



I 




Jack Knight 
Entered A. R. C. from Lanier Higli this year. 

Jack is a tall and handsome boy. We understand that there is 
something at Macon that attracts much of his attention. We 
wonder! Lanier High School surely lost a fine student last year 
when Jack moved to Augusta. 

Moody Elmo Layfield 

1st Lieutenant 4: Member Sabre Club; Company Football 4: 
Secretary of Literary Society 1 ; Annual Staff, Art Editor, 4. 

Elmo is the artist of the senior class. He was recently made a 
1st Lieutenant of the Freshman Battalion. He is also a member 
of the '34 Track Team. He is the Art Editor of our '34 Annual. 

Victor R. Levy 

High Honor 1: Honor 2; Sergeant R.O.T.C. 3; Art Editor 
.•\nnual 3; 4 year course in 3 years. 

Victor is a little guy full of humor. His favorite sport is 
arguing, especialh- with the teachers. He had rather indulge in 
this pastime than make wise-cracks, and that is saying a great 
deal. 






James AIelton 

Honor 2; Sergeant. 

Although "Happy" lost a whole semester of last year on 
account of sickness, he is making up for the time. He is working 
hard for his "dip," and we sincerely hope he gets it. 



William Henry AIcDaniel 

Lieutenant 2; Company Football 3 years; Baseball 1 year; 
Rifle Team, 

We wonder whj' Billy can always be seen on Lakemont, but 
we think the big attraction is Frances. Billy has worked hard to 
get his diploma this year, and we wish him and Frances much 
success in the future. 

D. McFaden 

Corporal 2; Sergeant 3: 2nd Lieutenant 4; Company Football 1, 
2, 3, 4: Football; Glee Club, 3 and 4; Band 1, 2, 3,' 4; Officers' 
Club 4; School Orchestra 3 and 4. 

Dan is the big boy with the sticks in the band, and can he 
rattle that drum! He has played company football ever since he 
came to A. R. C. He has been a member of the school orchestra 
and Glee Club for the past two years. He was recently made a 
2nd Lieutenant in the Band and a member of the Sabre Club. 










David ]\Io^■H 

Sergeant 4; Company Football 2 and 3. 

Moye is becoming an excellent farmer 
bandies bi-^ model "T" truck as a master, 
toward wfrrk foretells a successful business career. 



in bis leisure. He 
His serious attitude 



Harry B. Nea'. 

Honor 1; Higb Honor 2; Honor 3; Sergeant 3; Lieutenant 4; 
Literary Society 2; Rifle Team member 4: Hi-Y 4. 

Harry has been tbe little boy with the big l)rain since entering 
the A. R. C. Although he is not as big as a minute, he has gone 
right up in the military department to a 2nd Lieutenant in his 
fourth year. He won a medal for being a memlser of the winning 
rifle team in '34. 



J. C. Oliver 

Lieutenant 4: Rifle Team Company B. 

Jack is one of the neatest fellows in our whole cadet corps. He 
always wears his uniform correctly, presenting a neat military 
appearance. We are glad to see him receive his commission this 
year because we know he deserves it. "Mor powuh to yuh," Jack. 



James J. O'Shea 

Honor 1; Sergeant 3. 

Jimmy does not hurt himself studying, nor does he strain his 
eyes poring over books: but he is working hard enough to 
assure himself a seat on the stage for this June. 



John N. Owens 

Honor 1 and 3; High Honor; Sergeant in Military; \'ice Presi- 
dent of Literary Society; Track Team 3. 

Jolin is just one of those likeable fellows who makes friends of 
everyone he comes in contact with. He was a high-jumper on our 
track team until he broke his arm one day while attempting 
to jump over a tennis net "humpty" feet high. Take warning, A. 
R. C; you are losing a "swell guy." 



William F. Pardue 



Honor 



William is a conscientious, hard-working boy. He has decided 
to make a name for himself in the outside world as a chemist. 
We know that he will realize his plans because he has the two 
essentials that are necessary — a knowledge of the subject and a 
spirit that will never quit. 



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Kenneth A. Phillips 
Corporal 2 and 3; Sergeant 4; Literary Society 3 and 4: Glee 
Club 3 and 4. 

"Ken" is the singer of tlie Senior Class. He lias been very faith- 
ful in everything he attempts to do. Kenneth is going out for a 
musical career and we all know he is going to succeed. Here's 
wishing you all the luck in your profession. 



W. C. Phillips, Jr. 
Corporal 3. 

"W. C." is a fine fellow, who works hard and is liked by all; 
but his friends fear that some day we shall find an elephant in- 
stead of W. C, if his peanut appetite doesn't diminish. We need 
not worry about the fate of the lunch room as long as W. C. 
gives it his peanut business. 



Ralph Pritchard 
Sergeant 2, 3 and 4; Lieutenant 4; Literarj' Society 1, 2, and 3. 

He is one of those big "he-men," who rate a lieutenant's place — 
"A" company. He always has a great l)ig s;nile. 



Honor 2; 



Frank Palmer Rainwater 
President of Freshman Class. 



Frank is well liked by all who know him, for whenever you 
meet him he always greets you with a bright smile. His friendly 
disposition has made for him many friends during his stay in 
the Academv. 



Patrick Redd 
Sergeant 3 and 4. 

Although "Pat" has not gone in for school activities to any 
extent, he has made himself widely known. His unassuming and 
thoughtful ways have brought to him many life-long friendships. 
The A. R. C. will lose a valuable landmark when "Pat" leaves: 



J. Taylor Sanders 

High Honor 1: Honor 2: Gold "R" 3: 4 year course in 3 years: 
Literary Society 2 and 3; Glee Club 3: 2nd Lieutenant in Band 3; 
Richmond Hi-Y 2 and 3: Treasurer Hi-Y 3. 

Sanders joined our class in '31. He is a quiet fellow, but one 
who has volumes of thought behind each action. He is a talented 
musician, and has served our band faithfully from the rank of 
private to lieutenant. Although serving as Literary Editor of the 
Annual, Sanders has held his scholastic work at its high level. 



f 



m 





0X^ 




Mitchell John Scavens 

Honor 3; SerReant 4; Literary Society 3; President 2; Secre- 
tary 3: Debating Team 2 and 3: Academy Science Club Secretary, 
Track 3. 

"Mitcli" is the radio bug of our ancient an 1 honorable class. 
He was elected President of the Literary S- c'ety his 2nd year, 
and was an alternate on the '32 and '33 Debating Teams. He was 
also a member of our Track Team in \t3. Here's to you Mitch, 
old boy. Go get em. 

J. C. Shanah.^n 

Sergeant 4; Cliarter member and President of Richmond Hi-Y: 
Track Team 3. 

ames is the boy you often see riding about, mounted on a fiery 
steed. He is riding his lessons about as hard as his horse, for he 
is running a race with his "dip" to the finish. 



Johnnie Speering 
Sergeant 4: Football (letter): Track (no letter). 
The coach is always holding Johnnie up as an example of what 



a light man can do on the football team. Althougli Johnnie is 
light, he is one of our fastest men. 



T. Z. Sprott. Jr. 

High Honor, 1, 2, 3, and 4; 2nd Lieutenant 4; Member of Sabre 
Club; Editor-in-Chief of Annual: Gold "R" 4. 

T. Z. is a fellow who does his work in a thorough, jam-up man- 
ner, as evidenced by his splendid work on the annual. He is active 
in the school activities, for he was selected as a Gold "R" member 
recently. However, this does not keep T. Z. from his lessons ,as 
he is a high Iionor student. 

Henkv Elt.ene Steadman 

1st Sergeant. 

Although Steadman joined our class last September and has 
been witli us only one short year, he has proved himself a loyal 
memljer of the class of '34. He will be greatly missed when he is 
graduated from the A. R. C. 



Honor 
Team 4. 



Paul St.vnford 
Sergeant 3 and 4: Tennis Team 3: Football Scrub 



Did you see that streak of greased lightning? That was a tennis 
ball that Paul served. His main hobby is tearing a motorcycle 
apart and trying to put it together again. Best wishes for a suc- 
cessful I'uture, Paul. 






« 



I 







Honor 1; Graduated in 3 years; Coporal 2; Richmond Literary 
Society 1; Basketball Team 2 and 3; Company Football 1, 2, and 
3: Rifle Team: Richmond Golf Team 2. 

Joe, "Dunk," Stulb is one of our 3 year boys. He made an 
Honor his first year. He was a member of our '33 and '34 basket- 
ball team. He was also a member of the golf team in '33. He won 
a medal in '34 for being a member of the winning companj' rifle 
team. 

Edgar Royal Charles Stokeley, Jr. 
Honor 1 and 2: 4 year course in 3 1-2 j'ears; Sergeant 2; 2nd 
Lieutenant 3. 

An ambitious boy who has held a good job and still been 
graduated in three and a half years. He is quite skillful in ama- 
teur boxing. 



A. Toole 
High Honor 1 and 2; Fast Class; Student Council 1; 1st Ser- 
geant 3; Football Company 3; Hi-Y 2 and 3 (Academy). 

Gus is a little fellow, who is very consistent in his studies. He 
is one of the. members of the three-year class who always make 
good averages. At the same time, Toole is very popular among 
his classmates. 



B. USRY 
Lieutenant (2nd) 4; Track Team. 

"Buddy" is well known and liked by all his classmates. Right 
now the charms of a certain lassie on Heard Avenue have so 
strongly enticed him that it is hard for him to get his mind on 
his lessons. He is a firm believer in the motto, "Never let school 
work interfere with pleasure." Best wishes for a successful career, 
Buddy. 



Howard Raworth Walker, Jr. 
High Honor 1; Honor 2; Member of Literary Society 1; 4 
year course in 3 years. 

"Pink Tip" is an intellectual lad, as his record shows. He is 
doing a good job here, finishing the entire course in three 
years; and at the same time, he's doing it in a big way. 



Edward Stelling 
Highest Honor 1; High Honor 2; Literary Society 3; 2nd 
Lieutenant 3. 

Ed is another of our "smart" boys. He is popular among his 
classmates, and is known very well by a certain person on 
Russell Street. 









i 






mM 




Martin J. Wallace 

Honor 1; Corporal 3: Sergeant 4; Lieutenant 4; Literary 
Society 1; Glee Club 1. 

Wallace is one of our best cadets. He has risen to a lieutenancy 
right from a corporalcy. and it didn't take him long, either. Besides 
being active in the militarj- department. Martin has been mixing 
around in other school activities, as his honor list shows. 



W. White 
Academy Hi-Y 4; Entered 4th year. 

We can remember Billy by his motorcycle, and the day he was 
caught by the "cop." Billy says he was going only sixty-five, but 
tlie "cop" maintained he was speeding. 



Thoma.s T. Wilheit 
Corporal 2: Manager B. \'arsity under Coacli Bolton. 

\'ersatile Tom! The time spent in becoming a master in the 
field of woman and bird-hunting has kept him from taking full 
advantage of his natural ability in his school work. 



W. Wilson 
Honors in Math and History through school: Track Team '34. 

Woodrow is a very quiet boy and takes his studies seriously. 
His prowess as a hunter reaches headlines: three ducks, two rab- 
bits, two squirrels, and an o'possum. all with two shells. 



E. L. WlXGARD 
Oratorical Contest 2: Glee Club 3: Literary Society 4. 

Ernest, with his wit and perpetual grin, is the cause of Mr. 
Mac's gray hair. If it weren't for him, we could sleep during the 
sixth period. 



J. WORSHAM 
Corporal 4. 

Joe is a working boy who is not wastinu; any time in his young 
life. He is very popular witli his class and teachers liecause of 
his willingness to work. 



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College Golf Team 4; Manager Academy 
Tennis Team 4. 

All right Men! That's Lil Pierce. He never 
shows his seriousness, but he always brings 
down a good mark. Frank will make some 
college a "swell" cheer leader. 

Walter Fred Timm, Jr. 

Corporal 1 : Sergeant 2, 3, 4; 2nd Lieuten- 
ant 4: Literary Society 2, 3 and 4; Rifle 
Team Company A 4. 

The lanky blonde Lieutenant you have 
seen about A. R. C. is Fred. Through he 
looks like a bean pole, he is always sur- 
rounded by a multitude of co-eds. 

Honor 3; Sergeant 3; Chemistry Club 3; 
Company Football 3. 

D. Silver 

Although David seems bashful, you should 
see him in his Ford sometimes. "Rastling" 
and basketball are his long suits. 




High Honor 2; Sergeant 4: Literary Society, 
1, 2, 3, and 4: Glee Club 3 and 4; Track 3. 

Ben is one of our famous harmonica trou- 
badors. He has been a member of the Glee 
Club the last 2 years. He is an ardent mem- 
ber of our Literary Society, having been a 
member for four years. He was out for Track 
in '33. 

[ames Bailie 

1st Lieutenant 4; Literary Society 3 
years; Secretary 1 3-ear; Hi-Y 3 years; Presi- 
dent 4; Track 3 years; Basketball; Assistant 
Manager Musketeer 4; Company Rifle Team 
4; Inter-Collegiate; Inter-Class Council 3. 

A glance at Jimmie's honor list shows that 
he is an all-round good sport. His good na- 
ture has attracted to him a large group of 
friends. 

James Otto Hoover 

Honor 1 and 2; High Honor 3; President 
of Class 2; Sergeant 3; Student Council 2; 
Lieutenant 4; Academy Literary Society 2, 
3 and (President) 4; Glee Club 2, 3 and 4; 
Officers' Club 4; Academy Debating Team 
3; Gold "R" 4. 

In spite of frequent trips to Beach Island, 
Hoover has found time to accumulate a large 
group of friends of both sexes. His outstand- 
ing record in scholastic, military, and extra- 
classroom activities have won for him the 
coveted honor of the Gold "R" Society. 



J. JoPLIN 



Lieutenant 4; Sabre Club 4; 
Football 3 and 4; Radio Club 4. 



Company 



If advice on any subject you may need, 
seek Jack Joblin. He's an authority on all 
matters pertaining to radio. Indeed, we would 
have been the poorer, had we not had Jack 
in our class. 

I'''rank Wright Neal 

1st Lieutenant 4; Company Football 3; 
Baseball 1 and 2; Business Manager Annual 
4; Hi-Y 4; Cheer Leader 4. 

If you seek positive proof of Frank's busi- 
ness ability, look at the capable way in which 
he has handled the advertising department 
of our annual. Judge from his list of honors 
as to his efficiency in other fields. Wherever 
Frank goes, he has the heartiest wishes of 
his classmates. 

F. H. Pierce 

Assistant Manager, Football 3; Manager, 
Football 4; Cheer Leader 3; Head Cheer 
Leader, 4; Basketball (letter) 4; Manager Jr. 








<XMM 



% 




(CLASS PEOPHEGY 

SENIOE CLASS 19314 



Delhi. India. J\Iay 1, 1934. 

Dear Prophet : 

In reply to voiir letter asking assistance in prognosticating the fates and 
futures of your present classmates, I am writing you this epistle. My crystal globe 
has told me many interesting and unusual things about your friends. The crystal 
sphere carries me to 1948: 

Billie Forney and Gus Toole are operating a duck ranch in California. Their 
slogan is 'Wanta Buy a Duck?" 

Donald Kirkpatrick and John Owens are running a matrimonial agency. Their 
sole aim is to keep voung people from being disappointed in love, as they have 
been. 

Fred Hargrove is mavor of the great metropolis, Martinez. As a consequence, 
Ralph Hargrove is city clerk. 

Marion Dasher is the human skeleton in Stulb's Stupendous Shows, managed 
by Joe Stulb. 

Ernest Wingard and "Happy" Melton are associate editors of Captain Billy's 
"Whiz-Bang." while Joe Worsham is sales manager. 

"Mitch" Scavens and George Blanchard have perfected a chemical, which, 
when introduced into the atmosphere, will assure fair weather. This compound is 
to be- used especially when Tom Wilheit and Jack Oliver want to shoot rockets at 
the sun. 

Victor Levy is professor of psychology at Brookdale College. Dan McFaden 
is beating traps in Black Joe's Orchestra. They are appearing in person at the 
Lenox for one week only. 

Jim Hungerpiller has discovered a wonderful preparation known as "Cure-all." 
His assistant. Arthur McManus (may he rest in peace) is dead. He drank some of 
the medicine by mistake. 

Ken Phillips is the leading player in the operetta, "Hold That Tiger," which 
was a howling success. 

Charlie Coleman and Oreste Ferramosca are operating the peanut stand on 
the corner of Mcintosh and Broad Streets. Their chief customer is W. C. Phillips, 
who feeds peanuts to the elephants at Augusta's new zoo. 

James Shanahan and "Lei" Hutto are rookies in the cavalry. 

Willis Denny and George Hughes are bootlegging since the return of prohibi- 
tion. 

Jim Baggs is Georgia's most famous gambler — with his dancing dice. 

C. A. Leipold is foreman for a construction company that is huildin^T an indi- 
rect road to Aiken. 

Ben Pierce has made a profession of sardine fishing. He says the reason is 
that he likes to catch game fish. 

L. A. Bryant has just received his degree in civil engineering and is endeavor- 
ing to build a natural bridge in Colorado. 

David Daley is Chicago's most handsome cop. 

Frank Neal, by making use of his effective salesmanship, is inducing gunmen 
to buy his special made cap pistols. 

Leonard Garten is a keen razor salesman. 

Vernon Cawle)' is acting as Tarzan in the movie. "Tarzan and the Linn Men." 

Sincerely yours, 

KUDZU. THE CRYSTAL GAZER. 






I 





SENIOiy CLASS 




LL AND TESTAMENT 

Taylor Sanders 



Academy of Richmond County, 
State of Georgia. 

We, the members of the Senior Class of nineteen hundred and thirty- four, 
having passed through four long years of torment, punishment and mental torture, 
at the hands of our most learned professors, and, as a result thereof, being of 
doubtful sanity, do herebA- make, assign and designate this instrument as our last 
will and testament : 

Item 1. To our true friend and helper, Mr. J. L. Skinner, who has so willing- 
1\- helped and guided us in our work and the problems which have constantly come 
before us during our sojourn in this institution, we leave our sincere appreciation 
and good wishes. 

Item 2. To ]\Ir. Hardy we leave a dictophone with one record, "The follow- 
ing boys will report to the office directly after chapel." 

Item 3. To all Senior teachers, share and share alike, we leave one large 
dose of st3'chnine. 

Item 4, To our able commandant. Lieutenant Purswell, we leave one rocking 
horse and a commission in the cavalry. 

Item 5. To Mr. McDonald, David Daley leaves one foot of his manly height. 

Item 6. To Mr. Talley we leave one pint of "Mazola Oil" to be used as a 
lubricant for his slide rule, which, we hope, will facili*^a*^e h's correction of experi- 
ment papers. 

Item 7. To Miss Bailie, our librarian, we leave one machine which will 
continually "sh-h-h" at noisy students. 

Item 8. To our underclassmen, the Juniors, the Senior Class bequeaths its 
solemn dignity and the unlimited privilege of taking exams. 

Item 9. To Mrs. Eubanks we leave the motto, "Patience is a virtue." 

Item 10. To the panitor we leave a sparj' gun and a bottle of Walker's Devil- 
ment to be used in the faculty meetings. 

Item 11. To the Freshman Class we leave our deepest sympathy for the 
long and storm}- road the}' must travel before they become Seniors. 

Item 12. To Mr. Buckner we bequeath one book of "Deep Stuff." 

Item 13. To Mr. Mitchell we leave one subscription to the Detective Story 
Magazine, so that he will not have to confiscate them from the hoys in his study 
halls. 

Item 14. To our friend Uncle Bill Kennedy we leave one pair of red golf 
hose, also one well-worn golf ball. 

Item 15. To Air. Eubanks we leave a revised edition of the alphabet with 
special emphasis on the letters "A," "B," and "C," hoping that this arrangement 
will enable him to pass more students. 

Signed— TAYLOR SANDERS. 

Signed, i-ealed. and deliered by Class of 1934 to lie their last will and 
testament, in 'ho -re ence r)f the following witnesses: 

Signed— THE THREE AIUSKETEERS 
DINTY MOORE 
ANONYMOUS 




■1Q53Z- 









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A. Ke C. = J. Ge A« AUDITOiei'UMt 








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juniors 





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A. DoREMus Secretary 

C. Xelson President 

L. Leic VicePresidcnt 

A. DoREMUS Council 

G. Heath Treasurer 

A. Skinner Council 



Ackles, J. 
Adams, D. L. 
Alridge, A. 
Anderson, H. 
Anderson, R. 
Andrews, H. 
Antonokos, C. 
3ailes, G. 
Baldowski, C. 
Barinowski, W. T. 
Barnes, L. 
Barnard, B. 
Bennett, D. 
Bills, C. 
Bishop, H. 
Bland, W. 
Brantley, C. 
Brodeur, E. 
Campbell, H. 
Carswell, J. J. 
Chisolm, L. 
Clark, V. 
Clary, T. 
Collins, L 
Corr, E. 

Courtney, J. C. 
Covar, A. B. 
Cutler, J. P. 
Daley, Robert 
Daniel, Billy 
Davidson, V. 
Dean, C. 
Deas, F. 
DeMedicis, H. 
Dooley, J. 
Doremus, A. 
Eavenson, C. 
Elixson, J. 
Evans, William 
Faughnan, D. 
Florie, W. M. 



Folsom. A 
Forbes, O. 
Fortune, C. 
Fortune, J. 
Franklin, D. 
Fulghum, K. 
Fuller, William 
Golstein, M. 
Gracey, R. 
Griffin, F. 
Greene, W. 
Grizzell, R. 
Hall, Howard 
Hall, J. 
Hardin, W. 
Hardy, George 
Harries, Bud 
Harvley, Guy 
Harter, J. 
Hatcher, E. 
Haynie, William 
Haywood, W. 
Heath, G. 
Heath, J. 
H'-ffernan, Joe 
Holley, Fred 
Holley, M. 
Hooper, F. 
Hutson, W. 
Inman, O. B. 
Ivey, C. 
Jeffcoat, H. 
Jenkins, C. 
Jenkins, Carpenter 
Jenkins, R. 
Johnson, M. 
Kale, Bill 
Kerr, J. 
'-'it "hens, E. 
K'.ein, M. 
Krewson, J. 
Limback, C. H. 



Lang, C. A. 
Lanier, J. 
Lazenby, O. 
Leary, R. 
Lee, L. 
Lemon, C. 
Lewis, E. 
Lewis, J. 
Maddox, A. 
Maddox. E. 
Marshall, C. 
Masters, J. 
McDonald, J. 
McElwaine, S. 
McKie, A. 
McLarty, R. 
Meeler, W. 
Metts, A. 
Mobley, J. 
Montgomery, L 
Moran, E. 
Morgan, H. 
Morris, A. 
Morris, S. 
Moss, G. 
Murphy, L. 
Murray, F. 
Nelson, C. 
Newman, R. 
O'Bryne, C. 
O'Connor, A. 
Odum, J. H. 
O'Hara, E. 
Ottinger, J. 
Pardue, J. 
Pardue, M. 
Pearre, C. 
Pember, F. 
Pereyra, J. 
Pitts, C. 
Pollard, W. 



Pollard, W. 
Pope, J. C. 
Popkin, H. 
Punaro, A. 
Raborn, J. 
Rae, L. 
Redd, O. M. 
Rhodes, G. 
Rizer, C. 
Rox, J. 
Rupert, J. 
Salley, R. 
Saye, S. 
Scoggins, R. 
Sheridan, L. 
Sherman, T. 
Skinner, A. 
Slaton, J. E. 
Spaulding, J. 
Stelling, E. 
Stokeley, M. 
Sullivan, M. T. 
Swearingen. H. 
Tanenbaum, J. L. 
Taylor, F. 
Tebow, J. E. 
Timmerman, Harry 
Thomas, A. 
Thompson, C. 
Turner, R. 
Tyson, B. 
Uhl, G. 
Waller, S. 
Waterhouse, J. N. 
Watkins, M. 
Wheatley, A. 
Wallace, W. 
White, W. O. 
Wilheit, P. 
Wilson, J. 
Woo, H. 
Young, J. 





YOUR LIBRARY 

The Library of the Junior College of Augusta and the Academy of Richmond County is your 
library, and we want you to enjoy the rights and privileges that are yours in the library. 

The library has been called the "heart" of the school. It is the storehouse for all printed 
material which is to be used by you in the processes of becoming well educated and learned. 

Yours is the privilege of having an attractively built room for tiie Library; fitted with book- 
shelves, tables, chairs, bulletin boards and other fixtures that are botli pleasing to the eye and 
comfortable. It is your right to insist that no one mar them in any way. If you appreciate having 
things look neat, then throw your scratch paper in the waste basket, instead of leaving it on the 
table or floor; and when you have finished reading a magazine or newspaper, put it back on the 
rack — someone else may want to read it; and ivhen you are leaving the Library, take time to 
push your chair up to the table. 

Books are far more interesting to read when they are clean and new and have not been 
thrown around, soiled, or had the corners of the pages turned down, torn, or written upon. Your 
Library contains many interesting and entertaining books as well as those which will provide you 
with material for required reading and woi'k. Make your Library a place for recreational 
reading as well as study. 

The librarian and her assistants are here for the purpose of helping 
you get the information you want and need. Call on them when you have 
something for class, or when you have some other question you want 
r.nswered. They are at your service. 

You are welcome to the Library and urged to come in and use it as 
your own. It is hoped that you will take advantage of this opportunity 
and make use of your rights and privileges here. 

MARGARET BAILIE, Librarian. 






Soph 



omores 





u 



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^i 



^ 




SOPHOWIOEE CLASS 

OFFIGIEyS ArHJD EOSTJEE 

C. Bearden President 

W. Kennedy Vice President 

J. Richardson Secretary 

G. Kelly Treasurer 

W. Kennedy Council 

J. Lackman Council 

Adkins, Sam Cunningham, Mell Hill, Max AInrphy, W. J. Silas, Raymond 

Allen, R. Dicks, Harold Hinson, T. J. Murray, Maurice Simon, Leon 

Allgood, R Daley, Randloph Hclley, C. D. Newman, L. Slaughter, Billie 

Anderson, T. Drane. S. Houston, Charles Newton, Robt. Smith, Coleman 

Anderson, J. C. Duckworth, T. W Howard, JuHan Nichols, L. C. Smith! Conrad 

Angelakos, Gus Dunnaway, R Howard, Lee Norvell, E. Smithi Jack 

Atkinson, J. C. Durst, Frank Jackson, Arthur Norvell, Paul Smith' Mahon 

Austin, Stewart Dyches, Dunbar, Jakes, ^^^ Olive, Robert Lee Smith Robert 

Avery, John, Dukes, M. Johnson, T. B. Owens, Herbert Snellings John 

Baker, Thomas Edenfield, R. J. Keels, J. H. Pardue, Billy Steed, h! 

Baldowski, C. A. Edgy, L. J. Kelly, Gordon Pardue, Harold Stelling Carl 

Barber, Preston Edmunds, Andrew Kelly, William Paulk, Linton Stelling! Herbert 

Bearden, Carlos Ellington, Claude Kendrick, Ed Peters, Hinton StevenV Billie 

Blanos, G. Elliott, R. A. Kennedy, W. Petrea, Ebbie Steinhart P 

Bedle, Robert Ellis, Robert Kesler, George Pierce, Conrad Stewart Wade 

Belger, Philip Ferramosca, J. King, Billy Pierce, William Stone, Jack 

Blitch, Arthur Fletcher, Autrell Kriesberg, Meyei Pollard, Harris Stulb,' Charlie 

Boatwright Arlis Fletcher, Wyatt Lackman, John Pomerance, Elliot Swan' L 

Boswell, Chas. Force, Gene Lamb, Tommie Pomerance, Leon Swindell Hasting 

Boswell, E. F. Fulghum, Henry LeSaur, Ben Pope, Ferrell Taylor, Earl 

Branch, C. E. Fuller, A. M. Lee, Bothwell Popkin, Harry Thaevos D 

Briscoe, Arthur Fuller, McDougall Lee, Elvin, Jr. Powell, C. Thigpen,' S H 

Broome, William Gaines, Henry Lever, J. Powell, Lownell Tobin J 

Bryans, Iverson Gardner, W. C. Levy, I. C. Rainwater, B. Towns P 

Bryngelson, T. Garrett, Henry Lewis, Wm. Rainwater, J. Turner Leslie 

Buck, Clarence Garrett, Robt. Linson, Palmer Rambo, Jack Turner' Cecil 

Bryson, James Gary, Albert Logue, J. B. Rambow, E. Tyce Louis 

Buford, Jennings Gavalas, Theo Long, Boyce Redd, A. Tyson, Sam 

Burton, Ben Gehrken, A. Lowe, E. Rogers Redd, Ben Velix, Jas 

Bowles, D. J. Ghann, Otis Lundy, H. Reynolds, John Verdery, Orville 

Calhoun, William Gilleon, Steve Maloney, Sharon J!!''°'^'^'l' J"°\ ^ Von Kamp, Harold 

Carpenter, Flovd GiUman, Stanley Marioni, Frank R^'ker r":,!. ^Y""^^''' ^^'"^^^ 

Carstarphen, F. Ghckert R Markwalter, Dick Roberts, L. B. Ware Forrest 

Carter, Cecil ^°ddard,VVhyte Martin, E. Roberts, V. Weathers, Herbert 

Carter, Harry L. ^xranade, Raymond Martin, G. Robinson, Frank Weed, W. C. 

Cave, Ernest Greene. Ben Martin, Wm. Robinson, Robert Wemstein, Abe 

Chandler, Brice Grealish, Laurence Mason, Dan Rogers, B. L. Whaley, Lawrence 

Clark, Herbert Gwinn, Charles Mason, Jack Rountree, Morgan \'' h'tely, Addie 

Cleckley, J. T, Hall, Carlvle Mattison, W. A. Rucker, Jack )v- I-*^'""' 9™^ 

Cottield, Lester Hall, J. E. May, Wardlaw Rupp, Charles Willi n's' r W 

Cone, Loyd Hartley, J. McCauley, Thomas Sancken, George \v'ii'^™t' u' t 

Connell, Jerome Havden, Ernest McCrany, D. Sancken, Herman w^w ' Vt ' i 

Cooper, D. Hail, John McNair, W. L Scarr, Billy Wil r^Geof^e^ 

Corry, J. M. Hamilton, Billy Meyers, W. Schueler, Geo. Wood, 'william 

Crawford, G. Hammond, Julian Miller, Roger Scoggins, W. Woolf H 

Crawford, Harold Hancock, Charles Mitchell, Belton Scott, Loyd Wright, David 

Crenshaw, A. C. Jr. Hancock, W. Moore, Geo. Seago, William Wright, Summer 

Crouch, Leroy Hannah, Sidney Moore, Joe Seigler, Joe Young,' Emory 

Crumley, J. Harrison, Parvey Mulherin, Bill Seigler, Wm. Young, Frank 

Cunningham, Ban Hewett, James Munn, Ben Shaffer, L. Young, James 



C> 






i 





Sho'-n'iiig Sci'ciilh Green on Jh'utttilitl School Golf Course 

In a city famous for its golf courses the Academy Campus Course stands head and 
shoulders above any other course in Augusta. Experts like Bobhy Jones, Walter Hagen. 
and Chester M. Sutton rate it several strokes harder than the Augusta National, and con- 
sider it superior to the Hill Course at the Club by a brassie and two putts. In the 
now immortal words of A. Dwight Deas, self-appointed Pro of the Campus Course, 
"Everywhere else }nu stroke your putts and watch them drop: on the Campus you hit 'em 
and hope." 

The Campus Course is the brain-child of "Uncle Bill" Kenned}- — a strong argument 
for birth control. Preparing for the National Open, and feeling the need of quiet prac- 
tice, he talked the Athletic Committee out of fifty Inicks and. in due time, produced a 
seven-hole cross-word puzzle. After two years he found the course too well suited to 
Mr. Maden's hooks and Mr. Owen's slices; so he changed the lay-nut and added two 
new holes. 

Several Faculty Tournaments have been held, all being won liy Mr. Kennedy. The 
Faculty always knows when a tournament is coming on — just before the Chami)inn runs 
out of new balls. However, he always arranges a prize for the runner-up — usuall\- a 
flashlight that won't work. 



The course record is held by President Skinner with a score of 147. Dean Hardy 
holds the putting championship with 7 putts on No. 4. Mr. .Allen holds the record for 
individual form — he faces northeast when driving southwest. Nor must we fail to men- 
tion Mr. Etheridge, who plays a good game without being able even to see the ball. Mrs. 
Eubanks quit after her first trial — the ball wouldn't talk back. 



What the course needs is a good l''th hole. 
and any man is entitled to a drink. 



Two times aroimd the Cam])us coin"se. 





[yreskmen 





CLASS OFFICERS AND ROSTER 



H. PAULOS 








President 


F. BRAID 








Vice President 


and Council 


E. HOLLINnsWOUTH 




Secretary 


S GIVENS 










Treasurer 


C. WHEELKR - - 








Council 


Abernathy. Lewis 


Blackwell, P. S. 


Cooic, J. 


' Danforth, E. 


C.,ay, Ed.' 


Han-ell, J. 


Allen, H. B. 


Bland. R. 


Cooper. Rilly 


Davaney. J. 


Gibson, C. 


Harrison, B. 


Amick, J. 


Boeckiiian, T. 


Cousart. James 


Da\'idson. E. 


Givens, S. 


Harveston, G. 


Anderson, C. 


Bolyavd. Frank 


Crawford. J. W. 


Deal. H. 


CHeason, T. 


Heath, F. 


Andrews, J. 


Boswell. J. D.. Jr. 


Cape. E, 


Dean. R. 


Goetchins, E. 


Heath, S. 


Ansley, H. C. 


Braswell. Homer 


Carrigan. T. 


Deween. IC. 


Goodwin. B. 


Heggie,. J. 


Archer, T. 


Brotherton, C. 


Carter. A. 


Dickson. C. 


Graham. S. 


Henderson. M. 


Arthur, J. 


Busch, .Sol 


Cave. L. 


Dinkins. H. 


Grubl)S. Franklin 


Herlong, M. 


Atkinson, J. 


Boozer. J. D. 


Chalker, C. A. 


Dinsmore. B. 


Gregg. H. L. 


Hickman, T. 


A vary, M. 


Boulineau. F. 


Chancy. C. 


Donev. A. J. 


Greene, A. 


Hicks. M 


Averett, M. 


Bovd, C'ornleious 


Chapman. Wm. 


Dixon. I.. 


Greene, E. 


Hildebrandt, H. 


Baber, Arthur 


Boyd, VVm. 


Chancy. L. 


Dressel. (). R. 


Griffin. H. 


Hill. C. 


Baggs, W. 


Bradley. W. 


Claffy. O. 


Durand, C. 


Griffin. L. 


Hollingsworth. E 


Bailey, P. ' 


Bray, H. G. 


Clarke. R. 


Dye, C. 


Guillebeau, W. 


Holsonback, O. J 


Baldowski, J. 


Braid. F. 


Clark. W. 


Easterling. \V. 


Gulledpe. Jack 


Holsonback, R. 


Balk, T. 


Britt. E. 


Claussen, H. 


Edmunds. W. F. 


Gutierrez, M. 


Howard, E. 


Barbin, R. 


Brodcur. R. 


Cliatt, D. 


Egleston, M. 


Gny, J. 


Howard, S. 


Barrett, A. 


Brown. Cas. 


Cole, E. 


Ellenberg, C. 


Harden, O. 


Howe, Bill 


Baston, C. 


Brown. Reuben 


Cochran, W. 


Elliott. D. 


Hall. Hugh 


Howell, L. 


Barnes, W. 


Bruce, Chas, 


Collins, P, 


Eubanks. J. 


Hall. Jas. E. 


Hudson, L. 


Bateinan, J. 


Bryant, C. C. 


Corbett, J. 


Evans, F. 


Hall, I.nther 


Hughes, A. L. 


Battey, A. 


Buck, \V. 


Covar, Abner 


Ferramosco. V. 


Hamniett, C. 


Hughes, F. 


Battle, C. 


Bullard, F. 


Creed, C. 


Fine. \. 


Hamilton. H. 


Hughes. L. 


Beasley, M. 


Burch, J. H. 


Crenshaw, J. 


Fitzgerald J. 


Hammock, B. D. 


Humphrey, D. 


Becker, J. 


Bushia. E. H. 


Crouch, J. 


Fort. M. 


Hancock. J. 


Hunnicutt. T. 


Beckworth, C. 


Bussey. J. 


Crozier, K. 


Fox. H. E. 


Hanley, R. 


Hardy. Wallace 


Belger, Roy 


Butler, J. P. 


Culpepper, D. 


Fulcher, J. 


Hanson. G. 


Hoover, John 


Beldiiig, I.. 


Bynington. B. 


Drake. William 


Floyd, T. I'. 


Hardeman. I^, 


Howell, Hui'h 


Best, J. H. 


Cantcy, I. 


Dyches, Hugh 


Garrard. J. 




Bishop, C. 


Cason, .T. W . 


Curtis, J, 


Garren. J. 


Hardin. J. 


Hunter, A. R. 


Black. L. F. 


Calloway, R. 


Daley, G. 


Gav, Bob 


Hardy, L. E. 


Inglett. J. 








H. 



Ivey, H. 

Jackson, Edward 
Jennings, Elbert 
Johnson, E. S. 
Jackson, E. 
Jackson. R. 
jopling 
Jones, K. 
Jones, L. 
Kelley, H. 
Kellev. T. 
Kelley, L. 
Kelley, M. 
Kearns, J. 
Kerr. E. 
King, W. O. 
Knapp, F. 
Krouse, Roy 
Lamar, B. 
Lainb, J. 
Lazenby, John 
Lamback, V. 
Le\T, B. 
Lewis. J. 
Little. W. H. 
Longfield, R. 
Loyal, R. 
Maddox, R. 
Maher. M. 
Mahoney, J. 
Markwalter, Al 
Mark waiter, C. 
Mason, Samuel 
Maxwell, Albert 
Mitchell, C. C. 
Moore, Forrest 
Maxwell, Bobby 



Mays, W. 
Meehan, S. 
]Meehan, T. 
Melles, G. 
Merritt, W. 
Mvers. J. 
Mvers. \V. 
Miller, J. 
Mills. J. C. 
Mize. G. 
Mobley, R. 
Montgomery, J. 
Moody, E. 
Morgan, R. 
Morgan, T. 
Morgan, W. 
Morris. L. 
Moss, L. 
Mosteller, M. 
Moye, B. 
Mulligan, Ted 
Murray, C. 
Murray, W, 
Murray, R. 
McGahee. J. 
McKie. C. 
McLarty, Rufus 
McManus, C. 
McRae, G. 
Xeal. Tr. 
Neal, L. 
Neill, W. 
Xewman, J. 
Xorris. T. 
Xowell, J. 
Ogilvie. J. 
Ouzts, J. 



ROSTER (Continued) 



Owens, S. 
O'Hara, C. 
Ogletree, Jas. \V. 
Owens, J. 
Pague, H. 
Palmer. L. E. 
Parker, H. 
Palmer, J. B. 
Pecan, Eugene 
Pond. ,»Ielvin 
Parrish, Chas. 
Parrish, C. R. 
Paulos, H. 
Pender, W. H. 
Perry, J. 
Peterson, M. 
Phelps, J. 
Philpot. DeS. 
Phillips, R. 
Plagwitz, Wm. 
Pollard. J. 
Pond, E. 
Powell. T. y. 
Powell, V.^ 
Powers. Wm. 
Price, W. 
Pritchard, H. 
Punaro, V. 
Purvis, H. 
Rachels, Wm. 
Ragan, A, 1, 
Ramsev. ^L 
Ramsey. R. W. 
Raynes, J. 
Reese, J. 
Reid. Raymond 
Reid, Robert 



Reid, William 
Redd, Henry 
Redd. Jesse 
Rivers, Joe 
Reynolds, J. W. 
Rhodes. A. 
Rhodes, Billy 
Rhodes, F. 
Richards, M. 
Richardson, R. 
Rice, Hugh 
Rickerson, V. 
Riley, F. 
Rinker, Frank 
Rivers, J. 
Roberts, A. 
Roberts, H. 
Roberts, S. 
Roesel, M. 
Rollins, E. L. 
Rosamond, W. 
Rosier, J. W. 
Ronton, J, 
Rox. B. 
Rupert, C. 
Satcher. E. 
Saxon, Joe 
Schofield.L. 
Scott, V. 
Scurlock, B. 
Seigler, H. 
Seigler, J. M, 
Scott, Walter 
Swan, R. 
Shanahan. T. 
Seigler, M, 
Seigler, P. 



B. 



Jr. 



Shaw, J. A. 
Sheehan, Al 
Sheppard, J. 
Simms, W. 
Skinner, E. 
Smith. E, 
Smith. F. 
Smith, J. 
Smth. Roy 
Smitherman, R. 
Snellings. B. 
Spears, J. 
Speering. F. 
Spiers, E. 
Stone. L. A. 
Storv, S. 
Stoyall, J. 
Sullivan, J. 
Sumner. J. 
Summeraux, G. 
Summerall. G. 
Sutton. Dan 
Sutton. C. 
Tankersley, J. 
Taylor, G. C. 
Taylor, R. 
Tebow, W. 
Teston, W. 
Thompson, E. 
Thompson, G. 
Timerman, J. 
Tjovaras, J. 
Tjovaras, P. 
Toomey, Joe 
Trommerhauser, B . 
Turner, J. W. 
Turner, W. C. 



Usry, Tom 
Usry. Willis 
Van Dyke, C. L. 
Vaughan, B. 
Vause, B. 
Vidler. J. 
\^lachos, O. 
Ward. Thornton 
Walker, M. 
Ware, R. 
\^'ilcher. Ja"k 
Williford, Gordon 
Wong. Thomas 
Woodruff. WiU-ara 
Woodward, E. 
Warr. C. 
Weeks, C. 
Whaler, C. 
Whalev, M. 
Wheatley, S. 
Wheeler, C. 
Wheeless, W. 
Widener, J. 
Wiggins, J. 
Williams. H. 
Willis. Billy 
Wilson, J. S. 
Wolfe, W. 
Woodward. C. 
Wright, N. 
Wvatt. Wallace 
Wyatt, Wallace 
Wynn. W. 
Young, B. 
Youn, E. 
Young. J. 
Youngblood, L. 




:35S3SftSt 





XJ^ ^ 




DESI DERATU 
Hexrv O. Read 



Is life but the grind of man's daily toil. 

With its ceaseless turn of the wheel : 
Must man be palsied in the vast turmoil 

That dis,£;uises the False as the Real .■' 

Is life but the breathing of tainted air. 

And a tempting sip of the glass ; 
Shall we take of the world just what we dare. 

\\'ith a sigh for the pleasures that pass ? 

Is life but the drawing of heaven's breath, 
And a gaze that sees only the stars : 

Is man to withdraw, in a living death. 

And glance down on the world through bars ? 

The beast may follow the treadmill's round. 

Unconscious of thralldom's chains ; 
The butterfly sips where flowers abound. — 

Drops down when his short day wanes ; 
The world has small place for the hermit saint. 

\\'ho kneels at his gilded shrine ; — 

The cry is for men in a world of men. 

Who labor and live and love. 
Who give of themselves to the uttermost. — then 

Reclaim fresh strength from above. 

This life is for men who live in the vale. 

But call down the lireath of the hills : 
Who drink from their cups (the Holy Grail !) 

The wine that true living distills. 





K 



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Jjeauiij ana feature 
Section 



1 




Carolyn White 



it. 




Mary Hull 




\ 



Elizabeth Daniel 




JoNME Mae Witt 
Most Iiilrllectiial Soj'lioiuorc 




Leonard Garten 
Most Intellectual Senior 




Jackie Stephens 

Best All-Roiind Soplioinorc 

Best J. C. A. Athh'lc 



1 




Margaret Jernigan 
Prettiest Freshman 




David Daley 
Best AU-Round Senior 
Best A. R. C. Athlete 




Katherine Bishop 
Most Popular Sophomore 




Samille Save 
Regimental Sponsor 




n 0. €. e. 



^1 

N I 



§k 










n[ON OF Ec Oo To Go 



"The mission of the R. O. T. C. is to awaken 
ill the student an appreciation of the obligations of 
citizenship, to prepare him to discharge his duties 
as a citizen, and to qualify him as a military leader." 

The R. O. T. C. AIanuel 
Infantry 






It is a pleasant duty tn express to ytni my sincere 
appreciation for your loyalty and integrity in our 
military achievements. Permit me to remind you 
that DUTY is the most important thing in life — 
nUTY TO GOD— TO COUNTRY— TO SELF. 

It is my earnest hope that you will ever let 
this be your motto in life. 

SAM PURSWELL, 

LsT Lt.. Inf., PMS & T. 







The R. O. T. C. unit can feel justly proud of 
having attained such high standards of military 
training and discipline. For four successive years 
The Academy of Richmond Coimty has lieen desig- 
nated an "honor high school." Duty is a pleasure 
with such a splendid grouji of cadets. 

The course in military science has a broadening 
influence upon the students educationally: has made 

thcni better citizens and lietter leaders of men than 
the\" otherwise would have been. 

J. A. LEI FOLD. 



I 





s 



IBANJD, BlL'eJLE ANJD DKUM GOEPS 



l\ 




George Fuller 
Captain 



Miss Gladys Bodeker 
Sponsor 



Gordon T. jNIoss 
Drum Major 



MR. D. :\r. LINCUL. Instructor 



Anderson, J. C. 
Adams, Daniel 
Amick, J. 
Atkinson, J. C. 
Barton, Robert 
Barton, Jaj- 
Battle, C. 
Beckworth, C. 
Baird, F. 
Baggs, Jim 
Chandler, Harold 
Curtis, F. 
Corbitt, F. 
Dasher, Marion 
Dunn, David 
Fuller, George L. 
Fulghum, Casper 



Ferramosca, V. 
Fox, F. E. 
Gaines, Henry 
Gaj-, E. 
Griffin, T. 
Givens, S. 

Hfnderscn, Harold 
Hartley, James 
Ivey, W. C. 
Jenkins, F. C. 
Kirkpatrick, Donald 
Knapp, F. 
Krouse, R . 
Moss, Bud 
McFaden, Dan 
McKie, Albert 
Moran, Allen 



Mason. Jack 
Moore, Joe 
McLarty, R. 
Murray, C. 
Moss, L. 
Punch, J. 
Pond. E. 
Ramsey, M. 
Saye, Sam 
Stevenson, Billy 
Sheehan, A. 
> Sanders, Taylor 
Tjavaras, P. 
Widener, Jack 
Wood, W. 
Youngblood, L. 




]iRoEeiMlENT/-\IL Sl^AFF 





Richard J. Wade 
Colonel 



Miss Samille Save 
Sponsor 



^'K 





UoBT. J. Bates Smith 
Lieutenant-Colonel 



Aliss AIakv W ij.lis 
Sponsor 







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tISg> 



lOCCCSiOl^ 



X3^_j. 



JRoEeiMJENTAlL 8TAFF 







Richard Daniel 
Major 




Miss Florence Bailey 
Sponsor 




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Chas. S. Daley ]\Iiss Estelle Beaufort Richard Russell Miss Sarah Kimbrell 
Capfaiu-Adjiitant Sponsor Captain Sponsor 



n 







William M. Hutson 
Stajf Sergeant 



Jerry A. McDonald 
Staff Sergeant 





FIEST JBATTALION 




John C. Stephens, Jr. 
Miijor 



AIiss Margaret Jernigan 
Sponsor 



Bill Kitchens 
Lieutenant -Adjutant 



m 



y 



i 



Capt. Charles C. Coleman Company A 

Capt. John C. Bell Company B 

Capt. J. Franklin Ellis Company C 





Chas. C. Coleman 
Captain 



Miss Mary Lyon Hull 
Sfonsor 



Frank W. Neal, Jr. 
First Lieutenant 



Ralph G. Pritchard 
Second Lieutenant 



Jack C. Brown 
Second Lieutenant 




r-.. TT tT 




~^^' 



:^^ 






I 



i 



COWOIPANY IB 




1 



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# 



i 



John C. Bell 
Captain 



JMjss Dorothy Hains 
Sponsor 



Ben Pierce 
First Lieutenant 



C. A. Leipold 
Second Lieutenant 



Francis E. Tiller 
Second Lieutenant 







\ 



^ 



^1 



COMPANY G 



I 




J. Franklin Ellis 
Captain 



Miss Lewis Davies 
Sponsor 



Robert B. Gracey 
First Lieutenant 



Edward L. Stelling 
Second Lieutenant 



William Usry 
Second Lieutenant 








It^ 



;econd battalion 



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Hi ^—r- 

"^ 

Richard C. Bryson AIiss Betty Trimble Leonard Garten 

Major Sponsor Licutcnant-Ad jiitant- 

Capt. Charles S. Daley Company E 

Capt. Carl W. Howard Company F 

Capt. Chauncey Clark Company G 





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OCIXCOX..^ ^^~-' 




eO WOP ANY It 






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David S. Daley 
Captain 



Miss Josephine Taft 
Sponsor 



DoRRAH L. NOWELL 

First Lieutenant 



Willis P. Denny 
Second Lieutenant 



Wm. B. McDaniel 
Second Lieutenant 




B 



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COMPANY F 



^1 
II 




Carl \\ 


. Howard 




Miss 


Grace 


Morgan 




James 


G. 


B 


ailie 


Co 


plain 






Sponsor 




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Chauncey Clark 
Captain 



Miss Evelyn BEN^rxr 
Sponsor 



E. Elliott Mor an 
First Lieutenant 



Wm. B. Forney 
Second Lieutenant 



James O. Hoover 
Second Lieutenant 





THIEJD JBATTALION 



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William R. Dunbar Miss Margaret Davies C. A. Lang 

Major Spo)iso)' Lieutenant-Adjutant 

Capt. Frank Ballentine Company I 

Capt. E. a. Pendleton, Jr Company K 

Capt. Charles Hardy Company L 

Capt. Charles Trommerhauser Company M 







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Frank Ballentine 
Captain 



Miss Carolyn White William Blandenburg 

Sponsor Second Lieutenant 



Wallace Dunbar 
First Lieutenant 



Fred W. Timm 
Second Lieutenant 




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E. A. Pendleton. Jr. 
Captain 



Miss Louise Battey 
Sponsor 



Hexry Eve 
First Lictitcnaui 



John H. Nichols 
Second Lieutenant 



J.\CK C. ( )liver 
Second Lieutenant 




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Charles Hardy 
Captain 



Miss June Wright 
S ponsor 



R. L. HuTTO 
F/o"/ Licutcnuut 



E. Hampton Brvsox 
Second Lieutenant 



Thomas Z. Sprott 
Second Lieutenant 




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Chas. Trommerhauser 
Captain 



Miss Mary Foreman 
Sponsor 



J. Elmo Layfield 
First Lieutenant 



Ernest Bern hard 
Second Lieutenant 



Harry B. Neal 
Second Lieutenant 





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lEIFLF. TEAM 



(Listed According to Rating j 
Sirith, Robt. J. Bate- (winner of Gen. Leonard Wood Medal) 
Fuller, Geo. L. 9. * Baker, Thomas 

Cleckley, J. T. 10. Willis. Denny 

White, Wm. O. 11. Kitchens, William 

5. *Dunbar, W^m. R. _ 12. Lackman, John K. 

6. Bell, Warren 13. *Grealish, Laurence 

7. Bell, John C. 14. Gracey. Robert 

8. Brown Jack 15. Pierce, Ben 

*Not in Picture. 




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N 




CLUB 



John C. Stephens Jr. 

John C. Bell 

H. Campbell Bryson 

COLONEL 
Wade Richard J. 

LT. COLONEL 
Smith, Robert. J. Bates 

MAJORS 
Stephens, John C. Jr. 
Bryson, H .Campljell 
Dunbar, William R. 
Daniel, Richard 

CAPTAINS 
Daley, Charles S. 

(Regt. Adj.) 
Russell, Richard 
Fuller, George L. 
Coleman, Chas. C. 
Bell, John C. 
Ellis, J. Franklin 
Daley, David S. 
Howard, Carl W. 
Clark, Chauncey 
Ballcntine, Frank 
Pendleton, E. A. Jr. 



President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Hardy, Charles 
Trommerliauser, Charles 

\ST LlEil'ENANTS 
Dasher, Marion 
Dunn, David 
Ivey, W. C. 
Kirkpatrick, Donald 
Neal, Frank W. 
Pierce, Ben 
Gracey, Robert B. 
Now'ell, Dorrali 
Bailie, James G. 
Moran, E. Elliott 
Blandenburg. William 
Eve. Henry 
Hutto, R. L. 
Layfield, J. Elmo 

2ND LIECTENANTS 
Barton, Robert 
Cliandler. Harold 
Henderson, Harold 
McF-aden. Dan 



Sander.':, Taylor 
Kitchens, William C. 
Brown, Jack C. 
Pritchard, Ralph G. 
Leipold, Calvin C. 
Tiller, Francis 
Stelling, Edward L. 
Usry. Billie 
Denny, Willis P. 
McDaniel, William B. 
Blanchard, Gci rge C. 
Wallace, J. Martin 
Forney, Bill B. 
Hoover, James O. 
Garten, Leonard 
Lang, C. A. 
Dunbar, Wallace 
Timni, Fred W^ 
Nichols, John H. 
Oliver, Jack C. 
Bryson, Hampton 
Bernhart, Ernest 
Neal, Harry B. 
Sprott, Thomas Z. 







It 



N 



Adams, D. L. 
Baggs, J. A. 
Bolyard. J. A. 
Fulghum, K. F. 
Jenkins, C. 
Lazenby, Otis 
McKie, A.. B. 
iEorris A. 
Moss, G. T. 
Clark, V.A. 
Cooper, A.K. 
Dooley, J. M. 
Grady, T. L. 
Heath, J. L. 
Owens, J. N. 
Bailev, C. J 
Evans, W, H.. 
Hungerpiller, J, A. 
Phillips, K. A. 
Rae, L. A. 
Speering, J. V. 
Bell, W. B. 
Calhoun. A. B. 
Fortune, J. C. 
Good, J. R. 
Marshall, G. J. 
Mobley, J. 
Redd, P. B. 
Hargrove, R.H. 
Baldovvski, C. H. 
Corr, J. E. 
Melton, J. M. 
Murray, F. J. 
Shannahan, J. C. 
Pollard, W. W. 
Pollard, W. L. 
Steadman, H. B. 
Chisolm. L, D, 
Heffernan, \V. H. 
Jordan, J. C. 
Stanford, P. C. 
Walker, M. C. 
Durden, S. B. 
Hargrove, F. M.Jr. 
Love, F. L. 
Adams, Lloyd 
Farr, C. G 
Moye, D. 
Rhodes, J. T. 
Sherman, T. F. 
Tvson. Sam 
Blum, S. 
Burns, B. W. 
Casella, V. 
Savage, J. W. 
Skinner, C. A. 
White, E. W. 
Jeffcoat, Harry 
Kale, W. A. 
Krewson, J. W. 
McLarty, R. A. 
Pardue, J. F. 
White, Wm. O. 
Davison, V. M, 
Doremus, C. A. 
Ferramoska, O. 
Hughes, G. T. 
Morris, S. D. 
Scavens, M. J. 






Cawlev, V. 
Lee, L. B. 
Lew. \'. 
O'Shea, J. J. 
Seago, G. H. 
Sheridan, T. L. 
Barnes. L. A. 
Brvant, L. A. 
Franklin, D. F. 
Toole, F. A, 

Corporals 
Anderson, J. C. Jr. 
Gaines, H. 
Hartly, J. 
Mason, Jack 
Stevens, Billie 
Widener. Jack 
Elison, J. B. 
Hollev, F. 
Mills. G. R. 
Pearre, C. 
Perevra, J. P. 
Rox, J. A. 
Slaton. J. E. 
Woisham, W, J. 
Barnard, Ben 
Bell. L. K. 
Brodeur. E. A. 
Deas, Frank 
Fortune, Charles 
Haynie. W. H. 
Lewis, S. J. 
Saye, Sam 
Cleckley, J. T. 
Cunningham, B. 
Cunningham. M. 
Hall, C. 

Kennedy. William 
Paulk. L. 
Smith, Conrad 
Waller, Earl 
.•\usten, S. 
Garrett, R. 
Hewitt, J. 
Jakes. W, 
Johnson. T. 
Martin. Wm. 
Smith, Coleman 
Steed, H. 
Allen. R. 
Elliott. R. A. 
Kelley, G. 
Owens, H. 
Scoggins. W. 
Shaffer, L. 
Whaley, L. 
Wilhelm, O. 

Privates 
Arlkins. Henry S. 
Allgood. Robert 
.Alridge, Carlton 
Anderson, Harvey 
Amick, Junius 
Anderson, Rufus 
Anderson, Taylor 
Andrews, Howard 
Atkinson. C. 
Avery, John J. 
Baggs, Wm. 
BaiHe, Giles 




E O S T E E 

11 SSI ON IE 10 OFFICEES AND '^ 
S OF ROeTo OJUN IT 



BaiclowsKi, C. 
Barinowski, \V. 
Battle. Clifton 
Bedel, Robert 
Belger, Philip 
Bennett, Dan 
Bishop, Herbert 
Bland. Warren 
Blitch. Arthur 
Boatright. Arlie 
Roswell, Charles 
Boswell, Ezra 
Bowles. Dan 
Braid, Francis 
Branch, Carl E. 
Brantley, Rodgers 
Broome. William 
Bryngelson. T. 
Bryson, Jas. T. 
Buck. Clarence 
Burch, Jas. 
Busbia. Eugene 
Burton. Ben 
Calhoun, Billy 
Campbell, Harry 
Carpenter, Floyd 
Carstarphen, F. 
Carswell, J. J. 
Carter, Cecil 
Carter, Ilan 
Carter, Harry 
Chandler, Bruce 
Clark, Herbert 
Clary. Thomas 
Coffield, Lester 
Collins, Louis 
Cone, Lloyd 
Conlon, Louie 
Connell. A. J. 
Cooper, Duncan 
Corbett, Duncan 
Corry, Jack 
Covar, A. B. 
Crawford. George 
Crawford, Harold 
Crouch, Leery 
Crumbly. John 
Curtis. Joe 
Daley, Robert 
Daley, Randolph 
Daley. Robert 
Dean. Carlisle 
deMedicis. Herbert 
DeWitt, Joe 
Dicks, Harold 
Drane, Steve 
Duckworth, T. W. 
Dukes, Mars 
Dunaway, Robert 
Durst, Frank 
Eavenson, Chas. 
Edenfield, Richard 
Ellington, Claude 
Ellis, Robert Wm. 
Faughnan, Doris 
Ferramosca, V. 
Fletcher, Autrell 
Fletcher, Wyatt 
Florie, Walter 
Folsom, Alva 



Forbes, George 
Fax, HiUiard 
Fuller, William O. 
Gardner, Walter 
Garrard, Jack 
Garrett, Henry 
Gary, Bert 
Gay, Edward 
Gehrken, Arnold 
Ghann, Otis 
Gillman, Stanley 
Givens, Shelton 
Glickert, Robert 
Glover, Chester 
Goddard. Whyte 
Goldstein, Meyer 
Granada, R. 
Greene, Ben 
Griffin, Louis 
Grizzell, Roy 
Gwin, Charles 
Hair, Quimby 
Hall, John E. 
Hall, James B. 
Hall, John R. 
Hamilton, Wm. 
Hannnond, Julian 
Hancock, Charles 
Hannah, Sidney 
Hardy, George 
Harries, Bud 
Hatcher, Edwin 
Hayden, Ernest 
Havwood, Frank 
Hill, Maxwell 
Hill, Thomas G. 
Holley, Clifford 
Holley, Jack 
Hooper, Frank 
Houston, Chas. 
Howard, Elkins 
Howard, Julian 
Howell, Lenwood 
Howard, Thos. S. 
Tnman, O. B. 
Ivey, Charles 
Jenkins, Charles 
Jenkins, Robert 
Johnson, Martin 
Johnson, Tyler 
Jopling, Jack 
Keels, James 
Kelly, Gordon 
Kelly. William 
Kendrick, Ed 
Kerr, John 
Kesler, George 
Kitchens, Earl 
Klein, Maurice 
Knapp, Frank 
Knight, L. Jack 
Kreisberg, Meyer 
Krouse, Roy 
Lackman, John 
Lamb, Tommy 
Lanier, James 



Lee, Elvin 
Lee, James B. 
Lemon, Cecil 
Lever. Jesse D. 
Levy, I. C. Jr. 
LeSueur, Bennie 
Lewis, Billy 
Lewis, Emory 
Linson, George 
Logue, Jess 
Long, Boyce 
Lowe, Rogers 
iladdox, Audley 
Maddox, Rov 
I\Iaher, M. J. 
i\Ialoney, Sheron 
JIarioni, Frank 
Markwalter, V. 
Martin, Edward 
Martin, Gordon 
May, Wardlaw 
Meeler, William 
Meyers, Walden 
Mitchell, Belton 
"Montgomery, Leek 
Moore, Joseph 
Morgan, Hugh 
Moss, Lamar 
Munn, Ben 
Murphey, Louis 
Murphey, Charles 
Murray, Charles 
Murray, Maurice 
McCauley, T. B. 
Mcllwaine, S. 
McLarty, Rufus 
AtcLelland, Eben 
Nelson, Curtis 
Newman, Ralph S. 
Newman, Lewis 
Nichols, Lenwood 
Nowell, Paul 
Norvell, Edwin 
O'Brnyne, Carl 
O'Connor, Arthur 
Odom, Jack 
Olive, Robert L. 
Ottinger, Julius 
Owens, Donald 
Pardue, D. M. 
Pardue, Harold 
Pardue, William 
Pember, Frederick 
Peters, I. N. 
Phillips. W. C. Jr. 
Pitts, Charles 
Plunkett. James 
Pomerance, Elliott 
Pomerance, Leon 
Pond, Edwin 
Pope, Ferrell 
Popkin, Harry 
Powell, Lownell 
Punaro, Angelo B. 
Ramsey, Mack 
Redd, Al 
Redd, Ben 
Redd, Otis 
Reynolds, John 
Rhodes, John 



Richardson, J. C. 
Rinker, Gerald 
Rizer, Carl 
Roberts, Lawrence 
Roberts, Vincent 
Robinson, R. A. 
Rountree, Morgan 
Rucker, Jack 
Rupert, John B. 
Rupp, Charles 
Sancken, George 
Sancken, Herman 
Scarr, Billy 
Schueler, George 
Scoggins. Richard 
Scott, Fred 
Seigler. William 
Senn , Thompson 
Sheehan, Al 
Silas, Raymond 
Silver, David 
Simon, Leon 
Slaughter. Billy 
Smith, Robert 
Snellings, John 
Stelling, Carl 
Stelling, Herbert 
Stewart, Wade 
Stokely. Meral 
Stone, Jack 
Story, Steed 
Stulb, Charlie 
Stulb, Joe 
Swan, Irvin 
Swindell, Hasting 
Tanenbanm, L. 
Taylor, Ficken 
Taylor, Earl 
Tebow, James 
Theavos, Denos 
Thigpen. Samuel 
Thomas, Arthur 
Thompson, Chas. 
Tjovaras, Pete 
Tobiri. John 
Towns, Preston 
Turner, Cecil 
Turner, Robert 
Tyce. Lewis 
Velix, James 
Verdery, Orville 
Von Kamp, H. 
Walker, Max 
Wallace, W. 
Weathers, Herbert 
Weinstein, Abe 
Whiteley. Addie 
Wilheit, Philip 
Williams, Arthur 
Williams, Clint 
Wilson, Joe 
Woo, Hon 
Wood, William 
Woodward, W. 
Woolf, Harley 
Wright, John 
Wright, Sumner 
Young, James 
Younblood, I.,eslie 



i 



m 



i 



1 





Hi 



•i 



E O S T E IE 



NONhCOMMI 



niONED OFFICJEES 
^ OF E. Oo T» C 

(CONTINUED) 



I 



Abernathy, Lewis 
Allen, H. B. 
Amick, J. 
Anderson, C. 
Andrews, J. 
Ansley, H. C. 
Archer, T. 
Arthur, J. 
Atkinson, J. 
Avary, M. 
Averett, M. 
Baber, Arthur 
Baggs, W. 
Bailey, P. 
Baldowski, J. 
Balk, T. 
Barbin, R. 
Barrett, A. 
Baston, C. 
Barnes, W. 
Bateman, J. 
Battey, A. 
Battle, C. 
Beasley, M. 
Beck worth, C. 
Belger, Roy 
Belding. L. 
Best. J. H. 
Bishop, C. 
Black. L. F. 
Blackwell, P. S. 
Bland, R. 
Boeckman. T. 
Bolyard, Frank 
Boswell, J. D., Jr. 
Braswell, Homer 
Brotherton, C. 
Busch. Sol 
Boozer, J. D. 
Boulineau, F. 
Boyd, Cornleious 
Boyd, Wra. 
Bradley. W. 
Bray, H. G. 
Braid, F. 
Britt, E. 
Brodeur, R. 
Brown, Cas. 
Brown, Reuben 
Bruce, Chas. 
Bryant, C. C. 
BuUard. F. 
Burch, J. H. 
Busbia, E. H. 
Bussey, J. 
Butler. J. P. 
Bynington, B. 
Cantey, [. 
Cason, T. \V. 
Calloway, R. 

Cook, .r. 

Cooper. Billy 
Gay, Ed. 
Goetchius, E. 



Goodwin, B. 
Graham. S. 
Grubbs. Franklin 
Oregg, H. L. 
Givens. S. 
Gleason, T. 
Cousart. James 
Crawford, J. W. 
Cape. E. 
Carrigan. T. 
Carter, A.. 
Cave, L. 
Chalker, C. A. 
Chancy, C. 
Chapman, Wm. 
Chaney, L. 
Claffv. O. 
Clarke, R. 
Clark, W. 
Claussen. H. 
Cliatt. D. 
Cole. E. 
Cochran, W. 
Colhns. P. 
Corbett, J. 
Covar, Abner 
Creed. C. 
Crenshaw, J. 
Crouch, J. 
Crozier, F. 
Culpepper, D. 
Drake, Willi.im 
Dyches, Hnyh 
Curtis, J. 
Daley, G. 
Danf'orth, E. 
Davaney, J. 
Davidson, E, 
Deal. H. 
Dean, R. ^ 
Deween, 1^3. 
Dickson, C. 
Dinkins, H. 
Dinsmore, B. 
Dixon, L. 
Dressel. O. R. 
Durand, C. 
Dye, C. 
Easterling. W. 
Edmunds, W. F. 
Egleston, M. 
Ellenherg-, C. 
Elliott, D. 
Eubanks. J. 
Evans, F. 
Ferramosco, V. 
Fine, N. 
Fitzgerald J. 
Fort, M. 
Fox, H. E. 
Floyd, J. P. 
Garrard, J. 
Garren, J. 
Gay, Bob 



Kelley, H. 
Kellev. J. 
Kelley, L. 
Keams. J. 
Kerr, E. 
King, W. O. 
Greene, A. 
Greene, E. 
Griffin. H. 
Griffin. L. 
Guillebeau, W. 
Gulledge, Jack 
Gutierrez, M. 
Guv, J. 
Hadden. O. 
Hail, Hugh 
Hall, Jas. E. 
Hall, Luther 
Hannnett, C. 
Hamilton, H. 
Hancock. J. 
Hanley, R. 
Hanson, G. 

Hardeman. L. 
Hardin, J. 

Hardy, L. E. 

Harrell. J. 

Harrison, It. 

Harveston, G. 

Heath, F. 

Heath, S. 

Heggiefc J. 

Henderson. M, 

Herlong, M. 

Hickman, T. 

Hicks, M 

Hildebrandt, H. 

Hill, c. 

Hollingsworth. E. 

Holsonback, R. 

Howard, E. 

Howard, S. 

Howe. Bill 

Howell, L. 

Hudson, L. 

Hughes. F. 

Hughes, L. 

Humphrey, D. 

Huunicutt, J. 

Hardy, Wallace 

Hoover, John 

Hunter, A. R. 

Inglett. J. 

Howell, Hui>h 

Shanahan, T. 

Seigler, M. 

Tvey, H. 

Jackson, Edward 

Jennings, Elbert 

Johnson, E. S. 

Jopling 

Jones, K. 

Jones, L. 

Ogletree, Jas. W. 



Owens, T. 
Pague, H. 
Palmer, L. E. 
Parker, H. 
Palmer, J. B. 
Pecan, F-u^'enc 
Pond, .vleh'in 
Knapp, F. 
Krouse, Roy 
Lamar, B. 
Lamb. J. 
Lazenby, John 
Lamback, V. 
Levy. B. 
Lewis, J. 
Little. W. H. 
Loval, R. 
-Maddox, R. 
Maher. M. 
Mahoney, J. 
Markwalter. Al 
Markwalter, C. 
Mason, Samuel 
Maxwell. Albert 
Mitchell. C. C. 
Moore, Forrest 

Maxwell. Bobby 

Mays, W. 

Meehan, S. 

Meehan, T. 

Merritt, W. 

Myers, T. 

Mvers, W. 

Miller. J. 

Mills, J. C. 

Mize, G. 

Mobley, R. 

Montgomery, J. 

Moody, E, 

Morgan, R. 

Morgan, T. 

Morris, L. 

Moss. L. 

Mosteller, M. 

Moye, B. 

Mulligan, Ted 

Murray, C. 

Murray. W. 

Murray, R. 

McGahee. J. 

McKie, C. 

McLarty, Rufus 

McRae, G. 

Neal. Jr. 

Neal, L. 

Neill. W. 

Newman, J. 

N orris. T. 

Nowell, J. 

Ogilvie. J. 

Owens, S. 
O'Hara, C. 
Parrish, Chas. 



Parrish, C. R. 
Paulos. H. 
Pender, W. H. 
Perfy, J. 
Peterson, M. 
Phelps, J. 
Philpot. DeS. 
Phillips. R. 
Plagwitz, Wm. 
Pollard. I. 
Pond, E. 
Powell, T._ Y. 
Powers, \\'m. 
Price. W. 
Pritchard, H. 
Punaro, V. 
Purvis, H. 
Rachels, Wm. 
Ragan, A. 1. 
Ramsey, M. 
Ramsey. R. W. 
Raynes, J. 
Reese, J. 
Reid, Raymond 
Kpid, RntT-T' 
Reid. William 
Redd, Henry 
Redd, Jesse 
Rivers, Joe 
Revnolds, J. W. 
Rhodes, A. 
Rhodes, Billy 
Rhodes, F. 
Richards, M. 
Richardson. R. 
Rice, Hugh 
Rickerson. V. 
Riley. F. 
Rinker, Frank 
Rivers, J. 
Rolierts, A. 
Roberts, H. 
Roberts, S. 
Roesel, M. 
Rollins. E. L. 
Rosamond, W. 
Rosier. J. W. 
Ronton, J. 
Rox. B. 
Rupert, C. 
Satcher. E. B. 
Saxon, Joe 
Schofield.L- 
Scott. V. 
Scurlock. B. 
Seigler, H. 
Seigler, J. ^L 
Scott, Walter 
Swan, R. 
Shaw. J. A. 
Sheehan. Al 
Sheppard. J. 
Simms, W, 
Skinner, E. 



Smith, F. 
Smith, J. 
Smth. Roy 
Smitherman. R. 
Snellings, B. 
Spears, J. 
Speering, F. 
Spiers, E. 
Stone. L. A., Jr. 
Storv, S. 
Stovall, J. 
Sullivan, J. 
Sumner. J. 
Summeraux, G. 
Summerall, G. 
Sutton, Dan 
Tankersley, J. 
Tavlor, G. C. 
Taylor. R. 
Tebow, W. 
Teston, W. 
Thompson, E. 
Thompson, G. 
Timerman, J. 
Tjovaras, J. 
Tjovaras, P. 
Toomey. Joe 
Trommerhauser, B. 
Turner, J. W. 
Turner, W. C. 
Seigler. P. 
Usrv. Tom 
\'an Dyke, C. L. 
\'augh2n, B. 
\'ause, B. 
Vidler. J. 
\\'ard, Thornton 
Walker. M. 
Ware, R. 
Wilrher. Ja:« 
Williford, Gordon 
Wong, Thomas 
Woodruff. William 
Woodwird, E. 
Warr. C. 
Weeks, C. 
Whaley, C. 
Whalev, M. 
Wheatley. S. 
Wheeler. C. 
Wheeless, W. 
\\"idener. J. 
Wiggins. J. 
Willis. Billy 
Wilson. J. S. 
\\ nhe. W. 
Woodward. C. 
Wrieht. N. 
Wvatt, Wallace 
W'nu. W. 
^"^unlT. B. 
^'oun. E. 
^'oung. J. 
Voungblood, L. 



M 









I 





Ox-ira GurrlcuLa 




(ZOLD np^'' soeiEirif 



Students who have earned Gold "R's" since organization. To earn a Gold "R," a student must 
show general all-round ability, and excel in at least two phases of school life 



1930 

Boyd, Welcome 
Fulton, Morris 
Skinner, James 
Currie, Brainard 

1931 
Bailie, Anderson 
Caswell, Theodore 
Clark, H. O. 
Gracey, Matt 
Mulherin, Frank 
Wade. Dick 
Whitney, Jack 



Anderson, Oliver 

1932 
Kelly, Alex 
Scruggs, Bland 
Currie, Marian 
Bolgla Julius 
Traylor, Bothwell 
Bell, John C. 
Stevens, Jackie 
Scrivener, Archie 

1933 
Bryson, Hampton 
Coleman, Charlie 
Dunbar, William 
Fuller, George 



Forney, Kenneth 
Krupp, John 
Maryott, Arthur 
Burnley, Frank 
Harbin, Henry 

1934 
Bearden, "Mutt" 
Daley, David 
Hoover, James 
Kitchens, Bill 
Sprott, T. Z. 
Skinner, Allen 
Sanders, Taylor 
White, W. O. 





PHll THfiA KAPlPrV 



(National Junior College Honorary Scholarship Society. Approved by the 
American Association of Junior Colleges.) 

Betj Xi Chapter at The Junior College of Augusta. Established 1932. 



1932 
(Charter Members) 

Eleaner Bearden 
Brainard Currie 
Morris Fulton 
Josephine Fry 

Llewellen Gibson 
Frank Harris 
Amelia Sheftall 
James Skinner Jr. 
Frances Garten 
Albert Whittle 



1933 
Helen Derrick 
Eljzabeth Elkins 
Dean Eric Hardy 
( Honorary) 

Berdie Ella James 
Morris Marks 
Pres. J. L. Skinner 

{ Honorary) 
Martha Walker 
Jack Whitney 



1934 
Katherine Bishop 
Louise Blackstone 
Frank Grady 
Juanita Haynie 
Roberta Ingle 
Ruth Jones 
Alex Kelly 
Elizabeth Lee 
Neal O'Shea 
Katrine Rawls 
Carolyn \\'hite 
JoNNiE ^L\E Witt 




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GOLLEGE OF AUGUSTA HI-Y 

OFFICERS 



First Term 
President . . Robt. J. Bates Smith 
Vice President . John C. Stephens Jr. 

Secretary John C. Bell 

Treasurer .... Sam H. Zealy 



Second Term 
President . . Robt. J. Bates Smith 
Vice President . . . John C. Bell 
Secretary .... Marion Currie 
Treasurer . H. Campbell Bryson 



John C. Bell 
Marion Currie 
Preston Delph 
Dubose Egleston 
Frank Mulherin 
Keen Hammond 
Thomas Saul 



ROLL 

Robt. J. Bates Smith 
John C. Stephens, Jr. 
Sam H. Zealy 
Luther Stafford 
Carl W. Howard 
Roswell McRae 
Read Wynn 



Dorrah Nowell 
Richard Daniel 
Cook Barwick 
H. Campbell Bryson 
James Green 
Emil Hummel 
Anderson C. Bailie 



ADVISORS 

Mr. H. O. Read 
Lieut. Sam Purswell 
Mr. S. O. Robertson 




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Peggy Redd ... President 

Mary Hull F ice President 

Kathryn Leipold Secretary 

Rebecca Guest Treasurer 

Nelle Legwen Program Chairman 

Emma Ruth Barksdale Ruth Jones 

Helen Barnard Elizabeth Lee 

Katherine Bishop Ehia Lombard 

EHzabeth Bostick Margaret Merry 

Jane Eve Fair Dean Nowell 

Miriam Fullbright Katrine Rawls 

Annette Gercke Ellen Shanahan 

Margaret Goldberg Eugenia Symms 

Sarah Harrell Jonnie Mae Witt 




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.DEMY HI-Y 

Coleman Smith President 

Allen Skinner Vice President 

Robert McLarty Secretary 

Alva Cooper ... Treasurer 

Mr. Albert Simpson Faculty Advisor 

Frank Neal Orville Verdery 

Harry Neal William N. White 

William Jakes Marion Dasher 

Robert Gracey ^ tt 

William Hutson J°^^^ ^all 

William White Gus Toole 

Gordon Kelly Lansing Lee 




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RICHMOND GHAJPTEE HI-Y 

David Daley President 

Treutlen Grady Vice President 

James Elixson Secretary 

Taylor Sanders Treasurer 

Mr. J. M. Robertson Faculty Advisor 



James Bailie 
Hampton Bryson 
Alex Doremus 
Sam Durden 
Earle Kitchens 
Donald Kirkpatrick 
Bothwell Lee 
George Rhodes 



George Sancken 
Herman Sanchen 
James Shanahan 
Charles Thompson 
Samuel Waller 
Bobby Mills 
Charlie Stulb 
Tom Baker 





ANNUAL STAFF 

Katherine Bishop (J. C. A.) Editor-in-Chief 

T. Z. Sprott (A. R. C.) Editor-in-Chief 

Jackie Stephens (J. C. A.) and Frank Neal (A. R. C.) . Business Managers 
Frank Ballentine (J.C.A.) and Robt. Gracey (A.R.C.) . Asst. Business Mgrs. 
Kathryn Leipold (J. C.A.) and Taylor Sanders (A. R.C.) . . Literary Editors 

ViCTOH Levy (A. R. C.) Joke Editor 

Frank Mulherin (J. C. A.) Picture Editor 

Kenneth Forney (J. C. A.) and Hampton Bryson (A. R. C.) . Sport Editors 

Bates Smith (J. C. A.) Military Editor 

Emily Brown (J.C.A.) and Elmo Layfield (A.R.C.) . . . Art Editors 

Tracy Levy (J.C.A.) . Sales Manager 

Ed Bailey ^ . . . Contributing Editor 

E. M. Allen Chairman of Faculty Com. 








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MUSKETJEEE STAFF 

G. M. Scott Chairman of Faculty Committee 

O. W. Chandler Advisor to Business Staff 

A. G. Owens 

Charlie Coleman Editor-in-Chief 

Jackie Stephens Managing Editor 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Alex Doremus Business Manager 

James Bailie Asst. Business Manager 

Frank Mulherin Assistant 

Alex Kelly Assistant 

CONTRIBUTORS 



Lansing Lee 
Frank Mulherin 
Dean Nowell 
Peggy Redd 
Dick Wade 
Harvey Wilson 



John Bell 
Dick Daniel 
Marion Dasher 
Frank Doremus 
George Fuller 
Katherine Kkai'ka 



(The Musketeer was edited largely by the journalism class during the 2nd semester) 





■» T n<i'«i ti.».Ojj i » 




J„ C. Ae LITEEAEY SOCIETY 



Officers for First Semester 
Marion Cuerie . . . President 
Elizabeth Lee . . Vice President 
Edward Bailey . . Sec'y and Treas. 

Mr. C. M. Sutton . Faculty Advisor 



Officers for Second Semester 

Marion Currie . . . President 

Elizabeth Lee . . Vice President 

Eugenia Symms . . Sec'v and Treas. 



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Barwick, Cook 
Baile}'. Edward 
Battey, Louise 
Boeckman, Anna 
Bogla, Julius 
Cheek, Phoebe 
Currie, Marion 
D3'e, Grace 
Doyle, John 
Fournace, Louise 
Gracey, Judith 
Gillman, Hannah 
Goldberg, Margaret 



Guest Beckie 
Hull, "Mary 
Holland, Mary 
Harris, Ruth 
Harrison, Wyona 
Hardin, Martha 
Heffernan, Agnes 
Ivey, Glenn 
James, Miriam 
Jones, Ruth 
Joe, Frances 
Jackson, Julia 
Jordan, Jessie 
Krafka, Katherine 



Kennedy, Mary 
Lee, Elizabeth 
Leipold, Katherine 
Levy, Trac}' 
Levkoff, Doris 
Legwen, Nell 
Mulcay, Mary 
Powell, Jimmie 
Punaro, Itala 
Reed, Harriett 
Stephens, Virginia 
Symms, Eugenia 
Willis, Mary 
White, Carolyn 





A« Ee Gc ILITEEAEY SOiCIEirY 



OFFICERS 



First Semester 
W. O. White .... President 
Alex Doeemus . . Vice President 
Marion Dasher . . . Secretary 
Curtis Nelson . . . Treasurer 



Second Semester 

J. Hoover President 

RoBT. McLarty . . Vice President 
Alex Doremus . . . Secretary 
Hampton Bryson . . . Treasurer 



Mr. J. E. Eubanks Faculty Adviser 



Bailie, J. 
Blanos, G. 
Bryson H. 
Bryson, J. T. 
Burns, B. 
Calhoun, W. C. 
Carswell, J. J. 
Chandler, B. 
Cooper, A. 
Dasher, M. 
Doremus, A. 
Drane, S. 
Elliott, M. 
Garten, L. 
Goldstein, M. 
Good, J. 
Gracey, R. 
Hooper, F. 
Hoover, J. 



Innian, O. B. 
Jakes, W. 
Kelly, W. 
Kirkpatrick, D. 
Kitchens, B. 
Lee, L. 
Lemon, C. 
Levy, V. 
McDonald, J. 
McKie, A. 
McLarty, R. 
Mobley, J. 
Nelson, C. 
Ottinger, J. 
Pardue, J. 
Phillips, K. 
Sancken, H. 
Sanders, T. 



Scavens, M. 
Saye, S. 
Sheridan, L. 
Skinner, A. 
Smith, C. 
Stelling, H. 
Stelling, E. 
Thompson, C. 
Timm, F. 
Tiller, F. 
Towns, P. 
Waller, E. 
Waller, S. 
Wallace, W. 
White, W. O. 
Wilheit, P. 
Wingard, E. 
Young, J. 





FEJESIHIMA.^ LITJtEAlBY SGGIETY 



Officers First Semester 
Earl Hollingsworth . . President 
Bobbie Maxwell . . Vice President 
Billy Wheeless . . . Secretary 
Clinton Wheeler . . . Chairman 



Officers Second Semester 
Jack McGahee . . . President 
Roy Smith . . . Vice President 
Mack Ramsey . . . Secretary 
William Merritt . . Chairman 



Mr. Joh't Moore Faculty Advisor 

MEMBERS 



Allen, H. B. 
Balk, Theo 
Barbin, Robert 
Barrett, Alex 
Beldiiig, Lambeth 
Carrigan, Teddy 
Claussen, Henry 
Cochrane, Billy 



Dye, Charles 
Goodwin, Bland 
Hildebrandt, Henry 
Lamb, B. 
Markwalter, Al 
McGahee, Jack 
McRae, Grady 
Mobley, R. 



Montgomery, Jerome 
Powers, Bill 
Ragan, A. T. 
Rinker, Frank 
Shannon, Tom 
Stone, L. A. 
Sullivan, John 
Thompson, Guyton 
Turner. Cecil 









EIHO ClIHI ]IP]EE-M[j|E]|DI!ieA]L eiLUB 

Ed Bailey President 

Tom Fulghum I 'ice President 

James Greene Secretary 

DuBosE Egleston Treasurer 

Bolgla, J. Pritchard,- P. 

Hummel. E. Saggus, H. 

Harbin, H. Saggus, R. 

Kelly, A. Stellings, F. 

Levy, T. W'arthen, V. 

Mulherin, F. Mize, H. 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Mr. H. O. Read 
Mr. C. A. Scruggs 
Mr. M. D. Young 



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Brodeur, E. 
Bostick, L. 
Barnard, H. 
Bell, J. 
Burns, B. 
Coleman, C. 
Clark, V. 
Doremus, F. 
Dasher, M. 
Daniel. E. 
Epps, J. 
Fuller, G. 
Fullbright, M. 
Forney, K. 



Fournace, L. 
Harrison, L. 
Holley, K. 
Hudson, L. 
Hoover, J. 
Hardman, R. 
James, M. 
Kitchens, B. 
Lemon, C. 
Levkofif. D. 
Linson, M. 
Morgan, H. 
^'lulcay, M. 
McGahee, V. 
Powell, J. 



Phillips, K. 
Ouarles, V. 
Robertson, R. 
Stefifan, D. 
Sanders, T. 
Sherman, R. 
Stelling, E. 
Sheridan, G. 
Von Kamp, H. 
Wiggins. A. 
Wilson. H. 
Worsham. V. 
Wade, D. 
Williams, R. C. 



FACULTY COMMITTEE 



N. Galloway, Chairman 
H. O. Read 

G. H. RlDGWAY 





SiCHOOL OIB-CHESTKA 

Frank Hardeman First Alto Saxophone 

Marion Dasher . Third .ilto Saxophone 

Donald Kirkpatrick Second Tenor Saxophone 

]. C. Anderson ■ . First Trumpet 

\Y. C. IvEY Second Trumpet 

Louise Fournace Banjo 

Sweeney Sikes Piano 

George Fuller (Director) Drums 





Ae Ee C. AND <JIL Ge Ae STUJDENT eOUNGIL 



A. F. Simpson 

John C. Stephens, Jr. 

RoBT. J. Bates Smith 



ROLL OF MEMBERS 



Chairman of Faculty Committee 

President 

. Secretary and Treasurer 



College Sophomores 
College Freshmen 
Academy Seniors 
Academy Juniors 
Academy Sophomores 
Academy Freshmen 



Miss Elizaljeth Lee 
Robt. J. Bates Smith 
John C. Stephens, Jr. 

John C. Bell 
Henry Harbin 
Wm. R. Dunbar 

Calvin A. Leipold 
Ben Pierce 
Francis Tiller 

Curtis Nelson 
Alex Doremus 
Allen Skinner 

Carlos Bearden 
William Kennedy 
John K. Lackman 

H. Paulos 
F. Braid 
S. Wheeler 





A. K„ Cc'dLCo A. FOOTBALL STADIUMl 





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A. F. Simpson, Director of Athletics 

The Department of Athletxs has had two primary ambitions. The first is clean sports, play- 
ed by bona fide students from our own county and section. The second is a broad programme 
of sports, so comprehensive that every student will have an opportunity to actively engage in at 
least one phase of athletics. 

We have solved these ambitions. Today the .Academy and Junior College are respected 
everywhere for their high standard of clean athletics. At the same time they set an example 
for other schools to follow in the diversity of sports offered the students: football, inter-company 
football, girls' basket ball, boys' basket ball, inter- class basket ball, track, tennis, golf, base ball. 

We believe that the future holds for our schools an even broader and finer programme of 
athletics — touching, in the years to come, every student, and carrj-ing our enviable reputation to 
every section of the country. 

ALBERT SIMPSON. 



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JFOdDTBAIlL 




Although hardly twenty-two candidates answer- 
ed the call for players, the J. C. A. Football Team 
had a moderately successful season. It won three 
games out of six. It developed, however, into a hard 
blocking, hard tackling, and hard fighting football 
team. This development was due to the work of 
Coach "Bob" Gressette, together with the ceaseless 
backing of Assistant Coach Albert Simpson and the 
boys on the team. The boys worked hard, took a 
good many hard knocks, but plaved football cheer- 
fully. 

For the opening game of the season, Carlisle 
came to Augusta with an experienced team. The 
game was almost, but not quite, a "walk-away" for 
Carlisle. The score was 33 to 0. 

The second game, which was against Belmont 
j'Vbbey, was a difTerent story. The J. C. A. came back 
hard and strong, outplaying Belmont on every play, 
to win by the close score of 13 to 12. The score gives 
a false impression, for one slip in the last few min- 
utes gave Belmont an undeserved totichdown. This 
victory, by the way, is the first victory ever won by the J. C. A. 

A week later the J. C. A. boys went to Charleston to play the Citadel Freshmen. 
This was the only out-^of-town game of the year. In this game, J. C. A. threatened 
to score three times, but was unable to gain the last few yards. Citadel won 25 to 0. 

The next game was against the Blue Ridge Junior College. The boys from 
North Carolina were good football players and good sports. They played better foot- 
ball than our boys to win by the score of 13 to 7. 

In the game against Erskine Freshmen, the J. C. A. "hit its stride." The J. C. A. 
team was blocking and tackling much better, but its biggest improvement was its 
better team-work This better team-work was largely responsible for the winning 
of this game, 20 to 7. 

To finish the season in "fine style" the J. C. A. beat Young Harris 19 to 0. The 
J. C. A. played its best game against Young Harris. We played on the offensive 
the largest part of the game. Young Harris could never keep the ball long enough 
to get close to the goal line. 

The team of last year wished us a more successful season than the one they 
had. We have carried their hopes the best we could, and think that we can proudly 
say that we have started toward "recovery." 



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Albert Simpson Coach 



Forwards 

Katlierine Bi-;linp (Captain) 
Eliia Lombard 
Sarah Brown 
Katlierine Gilison 

Guards 
A.cncs Hrff-r-an 
Miriam Fnrhriglit 
Libbo Bostick 
Jonn-'e Mae Witt 
Jo W'atkins 
Louise Fournace 

Centers 
Juanita Edwards (Alt. Captain) 
Beckv Guest 



SJXosUt 

Hint 
QJ cores 





c. 


A. 


. 14 vs. 


Warrenton 


26 




c. 


A. 


. 17 vs. 


Wrens . . . . 


57 




c. 


A. 


. 15 vs. 


Harlem . . . . 


11 




c. 


A. 


. 24 vs. 


Wrens . . . . 


14 




c. 


A. 


. 28 vs. 


Wrens . . . . 


33 




c. 


A. 


. 19 v;. 


X'idette . . . . 


20 




c. 


A. 


. 22 vs. 


Mt. St. Joseph 


25 




c. 


A. 


. 25 vs. 


Warrenton . . 


50 




c. 


A. 


. 24 vs. 


Harlem . . . . 


11 




c. 


A, 


. 28 vs. 


Bearing . . . . 


23 




c. 


A. 


. 36 vs. 


Dearinjj . . . . 


14 




c. 


A. 


. 2 vs. 


Mt. St. Josepl 


I 




c. 


A. 


. 9 vs. 


Warrenton . . 


40 




c. 


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. i2 vs. 


Louisville . . 


8 




c. 


A. 


24 vs. 


Evans .... 


21 




c. 


A. 


28 vs. 


Tubman . . . 


21 



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Ae Ee Cc BASKETBALL TEAWt 



G. L. Bolton 

Jimmy Lanier . . 

Letter-Men 

David Daley (Captain) . . . Center 

Hampton Bryson Forward 

Jack Swearingen Forward 

Charles Pearre Forward 

Curtis Nelson Guard 

Bobby Gleckert Guard 

George Kesler Guard 

Morgan Rountree Guard 

Jimmy Lanier Manager 

Reserves 

John Lackman Center 

Allen Skinner Guard 

Saul Blum Forward 

J. C. Courtney Forward 

Crawford Garrard Guard 

Allen Morris Guard 

Rupert Forward 



Coach 
Manager 



osier 
ana 
Qy cores 



A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 

R. C. 

R. C. 

R. C. 

R. C. 

R. C. 
A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 
A. R. C. 
Won . . 



A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 



Games Played 



30 vs. 

12 vs. 
25 vs. 
14 vs. 
11 vs. 
33 vs. 
28 vs. 

13 vs. 

14 vs. 

15 vs. 
52 vs. 
14 vs. 
41 vs. 
20 vs. 
27 vs. 
23 vs. 

, 9 and 



Warrenton . . 
Wrens ... 
Harlem . . . 
Wrens . . . , 
Benedictine . 
Washington . 
Washington . 
Savannah . . 
Benedictine . 
Graniteville . 
D earing . . . 
Savannah . . 
Dearing . . . 
Warrenton . . 
Tech High . . 
Faculty-J.C.A. 
Lost 



28 
26 
23 
21 
20 
21 
16 
54 
33 

8 
25 
28 
14 
12 
54 
16 

7 





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Go FOOTJBALL 



When the curtain rolled back on the 1933 
frotball season, ten veterans of the 1932 eleven 
answered Richmond's first call to the gridiron. 
These letter men Avere Leipold, Daley, Carswe'll, 
Plunkett, Bearden, Tiller, Grady, Heath, Hair, 
and Durden. The players were to look up to a 
new pilot of Richmond's destinies on the grid- 
iron this year. Coach "Big Six" Curtis Luckey 
replaced Coach Ike Sherlock. Coach Luckey is 
an old Richmond graduate. While at the Uni- 
versety of Georgia, our "Big Six" was a member 
of the 1926 All-Southern Team ; he was named 
on Georgia's Ail-Time Team. 

After four weeks of gruelling practice, the 
1933 edition of the Musketeers made their debut. 
On September 30, our cadets put a plucky War- 
renton team to rout to the tune of 59-0. On Octo- 
ber 7, the Musketeers carried our colors into the 
enemy camp. They played Glynn Academy of 
Brunswick. The second game of the season ended 
in defeat for our gallant men, 13-6, 

On October 14, Bailie Military Academy at- 
tacked our cadets on the Richmond field. From the opening whistle, Richmond was 
determined to atone for its defeat at the hands of Bailie last year. The "never-say- 
die" spirit of the Richmond cadets led them on to a well-earned victory, 13-0. 

The follow'ng weekend, October 20, the Musketeers packed their bags for 
battle with Valdosta High in Valdosta. Richmond entered the game sure of victory; 
Yea. this same sureness cost us the game. 32-14. 

On October 27. Richmond met her greatest foe in Richmond Stadium. Savannah 
High pro'ved to be our greatest foe in 1933. The battle raged; but every time the ball 
was in play Savannah's massive line and backfield gained ever so little through our 
lighter defense. An A. R. C. eleven has never fought a losing battle so valiantly to 
the end. In all justice to Savannah, their victory was well earned, 19-0. 

The team, broken in s])irit. lost a hard-fought game to Darlington High of 
Rome. The final score was 6-0. This game took place on November 11. 

With fire in their eyes to avenge the unfair defeat the preceding Saturday, the 
Musketeers met the strong Benedictine team in Richmond Stadium on November 17. 
This game was the most spectacular of the year, being featured with long runs, 
beautiful kicks, well-timed passes, and individual plays. When the smoke of battle 
cleared, the Musketeers marched forth, triumphantly bearing her laurels, 19-7. 

THANKGIVING DAY. NOVEMBER 25 ! What a day to. write of in Rich- 
::i^nd's rich football history. On Turkey Day the cadets of Richmond met the cadets 
of Riverside in their annual football classic. The stands were crowded — the bands 
were playing — uniforms on every side. In a flash of color the battle began. Rich- 
mond made a touchdown and the extra point. The Ijattle raged thicker every minute. 

Riverside made a touchdown. Riverside attempted a pass for the extra point. Our 
left end knocked the pass out of the receiver's hands, thereby saving the day for 
Alma Mater. The tide of battle ceased. Richmond was victorious, 7-6. The final 
curtain rang down on a successful year of football. Our Musketeers scored 118 
points to their opponents' 83. Coach Luckey dreams of a championship team for next 
year, and to the last man of us he has our support. 

CHAS. S. DALEY. 



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MEMBERS OF •■COMPANY E" CHAMPIONSHIP FOOTBALL TEAM 

COACHES 
Daley, D; Kesler, G; Lackman. J; Xowell. U; Swearenger. J. 

MEMBERS 



McDaniel, B. 
McFaden, D. 
Sancken. H. 
Shemian, T. 
Smith, F. 
Swint, L. 
Whitely, A. 
Young, J. C. 



Clark, C. ■ 
Avery, J. 
Baker, T. 
Denny, W. 
Hungerpillar, J. 
Jackson, B. 
Martin, W. 
Murphey, C. 




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J. C. A. GOLF TFAM 



Albert Simpson 

Frank Mulherin 
Bootsie Stafford 
Dick Mulherin 



Coach 



Alex Ogilie 
Tom Saul 
Ernil Hummel 



I 



J. C. A. 17 

J. C. A. 1314 

J. C. A. 22 

']. C. A. 15>4 

J. C. A. 10 

J. C. A. 16^ 

J. C. A. 7y2 

J. C. A. 36 



SCORES 

vs. Rollins College 1 

vs. Yale University 13j^ 

vs. Yale University 5 

vs. University of Ga. 2^/2 

vs. University of Ga. 8 

vs. Furman II/2 

vs. Furman 10^^ 

vs. Washington 





FACULTY TEAM— CHAMPlt )\:^ ijl- i. C. A. BASKETBALL LEAGUE 



^loore 




ALuk'n 


Young 




Bolton 


Gressette 


SiniijMJn 


Galloway 




DTIIER 1. C. A. BASKETBALL ILA.MS 



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1934 FIELD DAY WINNERS 



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Langston Bolton 

1933 Letter-Men 
in Track 

Sam Durden, Captain 
George Fuller 
Kenneth Forney 
Henry Harbin 
Jimmy Lanier, Mgr. 

Team 

Farr, C. 
Chandler, H. 
Speering, J. 
Usry, Billy 
Shanahan, J. 
Kennedy, W. 
Kitchens Bill 
White, Bill 
Daley, David 
Howard, C. 
Lackman, C. 
Lewis, E. 
Pearre 
Owens, J. 
Bailie. J. 
Cooper, A. 
Burns, B. 
Forney, K. 
Fogle, E. 
Lewis, Bill 
Wilheit, P. 
Daley, G. 



Coach 



Heavy Weight 

lOU Yard Dash 



1. 


Courtney 


2 


Shanahan, J. 


3. 


Mills 




220 Yard Dash 


I. 


Courtney 


2. 


Shanahan, J. 


3. 


Grady 




Shot Put 


1. 


Courtney 


2. 


Lackman 


3. 


Daley 




High Jump 


L 


Courtney 


2. 


Grady 


3. 


Speering 




Broad Jump 


1. 


Courtney 


2. 


Thompson 


3. 


Mills 



Middle Weight 
100 Yard Dash 

1. Baker 

2. Pearre 

3. Kennedy 

220 Yard Dash 
Baker 
Pearre 
Boyd 

High Jump 
Slaton 
Baker 
Pearre 
Broad Jump 
Slaton 
Pearre 
Baker 
Shot Put 
Baker 
Pearre 
3. White 

Junior Disc 

1. Baker 

2. Pearre 



Light Weight 

50 Yard Dash 

Paulos 
Casella 
. Shanahan, T. 

100 Yard Dash 

Paulos 
. Little 



3. Young 



3. Shanahan, T. 
High Jump 

1. Paulos 

2. Cunningham 

3. Dorenius 

Broad Jump 

1. Paulos 

2. Little 

3. Brodeur 
Cunningham 

Junior Disc 

1. Brodeur, E. 

2. Le Seur 

3. Cunningham 





CHEJEE LJEAJDJEES 



Here's to the Cheer Leaders — Frank Xeal. Bootsie Stafford, Dean Nowell, 
Katherine Bisliop and Frank Pierce — without whose rhythmic (hrection the 
Richmond and Junior College- stands would have heen a hedlam of unorganized 
noise. 

It is they who have timed our raucous shouts, and modulated somewhat the 
volume thereof, so that the people of the city have praised so highly the cheers 
and yells at our football games. Verily, in unison there is volume. 

The fighting Kichmimcl and Junior College elevens have never hafl to doubt 
the sentiments of our student body, so ably spurred on by our Cheer Leaders. 
More power to them ! 



r{r 



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J. C. PENNEY Co., Inc. 



824 BROAD STREET 



" It Pays To Shop at Penney's " 



Boston Hatters 


AFTER THE DANCE OR 




AFTER THE SHOW 


DRY CLEANING AND 


TO H:LLS THEY 


PRESSING CLUB 


ALWAYS GO 


YOUR OLD HAT MADE NEW 


Chili - Beer - Sodas 


WE CALL FOR AN3 CELIVER 

J N. ZEfvVOS. Prop. 209 8th St. 


HILL'S CAFE 


AUGUSTA. GFOHGIA 


636 BROAD ST. CURB SERVICE 




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Central Dry Cleaning 

COMPANY 
ONLY THE BEST CLEANING SERVICE 



PHONES 1400 & 2212 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



That's Different 
Mary: "So Frank said that I had a skin one loves to touch." 
"Not exactly, dear: lie said you had a skin you love to retouch." 

* * * * 

"Hey, mister, do you know enough about football to act as referee? 
"Mon, I know enough about football not to." 

* ♦ ♦ * 

"So you run a duck farm. Business picking up?" 
"No: picking down." 



'^ 



LocHuut. McAulitl.&Co. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 




INCORPORATED 
807 BROAD STREET 


LEE, COMGDOM 


<K 


Weal Lstnle, 1 ire and 


EULCHER 




t^asunltii Insurance, Ourelij 


Atfopnci)s at Low 




bonds. 


Augusta, Georgia 





Wash At 

Hulse Laundry 

"Just a Good One" 

6871 - - - PHONES - - - 51.^ 
LAUNDRY ----- DRY CLE.\NING 



^: 




World's Largest Bus System 

Serz'cs AH America Best 

(.ire\ bound bus will take you there 
jironiptly, comfortably, and at less cost. 
See your nearest agent, or write to 
Atlantic Greyhound Lines, 601 \'irginia 
Street, Charleston, W. Va. 

ATLANTIC 

GREYHOUND 






4,n-e.!L, 



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F. E. Ferris & Co. 

Clothiers & Haberdashers 



753 BROAD ST. AUGUSTA. GA. 





Dapper Dan Shoes 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


/•or Men and Young Men 
Exclusive at 


S. H.KRESS&CO. 


YOUNG MEN'S SHOP 

All Styles 


5c. lOc & 25c Store 


$3.30 




813 B;;oAD Street 



VoU /TaNT ool US ! 





^os "Broun \n Lloss'i / 





^ A 



LloR^^bvs 



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THE 
AUGUSTA HERALD 

The One Paper in Most 

Homes — The Only Paper 

in Many Homes 

Augustas Best and Most 
Progressive Paper 



COMPLIMENTS OP 
RHODES-HARKINS 

FURNITURE CO.. INC. 

COMPLETE HOUSE 
FURXiSHERS 

1051 Broad St. 
Augusta, Georgia 



HOUSTON 

ICE AND COAL COMPANY 



HOME OWNED 



11 



The Winner 

Dean Hardy w.s on his way to work one morning when he saw a group of boys 
standing around a small dog. When Hardy came up to the boys he asked them what 
they were doing. 

"Why. we're trying to see who can tell the biggest lie," said one of the lads, "and 
the one who can, gets the dog." 

"I'm surprised at you," said the Dean. "Don't you know it's wrong to tell lies? Why, 
when I was a little boy, I never told a lie." 

There was a moment of silence as the bo\'s looked at each other. Then one of them 
shouted: "Here's the dog mister. You win! 



THE NATIONAL EXCHANGE BANK 

OF 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 
STRONG SOUND PROGRESSIVE 

WE CORDIALLY SOLICIT 
YOUR BUSINESS 



^: 



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Bailie Furniture 
Company 

^\ E FRAME DIPLOMAS 

712 Broad Street 
Augusta, Georgia 



BOWEN BROS. 

HARDEN ARE CO. 

Sporting Goods Headquarters 

BASEBALL. FOOTBALL. 

BASKET-BALL Al^D 

TENNIS SUPPLIES 

90S Broad Street 



entral £arden llorisl 










Mutations of a Mere Man 



-Si: 



As a man grows older and wiser he talks 
less and fays more. 

But a man rarely gets to be as old as 
he feels at twenty-one. 

According to William Feather, a man's 
age can be determined b}' the degree of 
pain he feels on coming in contact with 
a new idea. 

At twenty-one you blush when a man 
praises you; at thirt}' you think him a 
clever fellow; at forty you wonder what 
he wants. 

An experienced business man is one 
who realizes that the fellow who called 
him up six times while he was out, isn't 
trying to give him anything. 

Never call a man a little shrimp. Speak 
of his Napoleonic compactness, and he 
will be your friend for life. 

Generall}' speaking, man will never 
regard woman as his equal until he can 
slap her on the back, tell her a funny 
story, and borrow a dollar from her. 

Probably the reason fat men are always 
so good-natured is because it takes them 
so long to get mad clear through. 

The theory that mankind sprang from 
anthropoid apes will not excite much 
attention if men will continue to keep 
their legs covered. 

Avoid a man who will not stop to see 
see a dog fight. He is either too stupid 
or too angelic to be of any practical use 
in this world. 

A married man is one who concentrates 
on one woman. A bachelor is a man who 



can't concentrate. 

Age of Discretion; The age when 
emotions are replaced by symptoms. 

Mr.ny a man who wouldn't accept any 
but a certified check, will trust implicitly 
in what is printed on the label of a bottle. 

An eel will swim 3,000 miles to find 
himself a mate. And then, we suppose, 
the fool fish will say that the lady eel 
"lured" him into matrimony. 

It takes more than shell-rimmed glasses 
and a full beard for some men to disguise 
their interest in themselves. 

A fat man has this advantage over his 
thin brethren — he knows exactly where 
his cigar ashes are going to land. 

There is no dobut about it, the average 
man would be a polygamist were it not 
for one serious drawback. His wife won't 
let him. 

The woman who interests a man most 
is the one who makes him talk most 
about himself. 

It is remarkable how much patience a 
man can have with a woman, if he isn't 
married to her. 

The Dictaphone is a valuable asset in 
any ofifice. It never takes a man's mind 
off the business he has at hand. 

"The best committee is a committee of 
three," says a business man, "with one 
of them sick and the other dead." 

Man is that inconsistent animal who is 
always insisting on hotel service around 
home, and a home invironment at hotels. 



J" 



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Augusta Optical 
Company 


Augusta Garage 

Ed Carter 


ROBT. W. GATLIN 




(successor) 


NASH LAFAYETTE 


DEPENDABLE OPTICAL 


CARS CARS 


SERVICE 


740 Reynolds St. Phone 2135 


Masonic l-Suildini;' f^hone 2664 





COMPLIMENTS OF 



HULL, BARRETT 
WILLINGHAM 



& 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

Augusta, Georgia 



"Did vou see those three fellows that just passed us?" 
"Yeah. Why?" 

"\\'en, the fellow in tlie middle owes me $10 — and the otlier two s-.id 'Hello.' " 

* * » * 

Sikes: "The green garden snakes around here are not harmful." 
Miss Bogga: "Aren't they as dangerous as the ripe ones?" 



GARDEN CITY ENGRAVING CO. 

ILLUSTRATORS DESIGNERS 
PHOTO ENGRAVERS 

AUGUSTA, GA. 



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E. F. HARLEY 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


GROCERIES. FRUITS AND 


fLADIES OUTFITTERSy 


VEGETABLES 

OYSTERS IX SEASON 

Prompt Service Prices Right 


-The Store of Better Values" 


2120 Oglethorpe Ave. Phones 6716-17 


1054 Broad Street 



AUGUSTA SPORTING GOODS CO. 

EXCL USl FE DISTRIB UTOKS 

SPALDING. GOLDSMITH AXD WILSON 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 



GOLF AND TENNIS SLTPPLIES 

212-214 Eighth Street 



FISHING SUPPLIES 

Phone 3280 




^ 



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HARRY W. JERNIGAN 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


Agent For flic 

ESTATE HEATROLA. 
HARDWARE. STOVES 




HOTEL RICHMOND 
ORCHESTRA 


ATS!T> PAINT 




HOTEL RICHMOND 


1039 Broad St. Phone 


219 


Augusta. Ga. 



COLLEGIATE CLOTHES 

J. B. WHITE 6- CO. 



=^ 



936 BROAD STREET 



PHONE 3500 



Grounds 

Jackson (gloomily): "Mali wife done quit lier job." 
Jinison: "What yo' gwine do about hit?" 
Jackson: "Ah's gwine divo'ce her fo' desertion." 



Compliments of 

The Citizens and Southern National 

Bank 



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PROVEN BY THE PAST - CONFIDENT OF THE FUTURE 

GEORGIA RAILROAD BANK 
& TRUST CO. 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



R. E. ELLIOTT & SONS 



BICYCLES AND 

MOTORCYCLES 

PAY AS YOU RIDE 

R. L. SuMERAu & Son 

Phone 4320 1248 Broad St. 




Hello E«Ui 






«>- <y 



fl TooRscoRe OR else...- 




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COMPLIMENTS OF 


MAXWELL 


BROS. 






FU R N 1 T U R E 


RIVERSIDE 


MILLS 










933-35 BROAD ST. 


PHONE 4000 



FEEDRIGHT MILLING COMPANY 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



''Your ¥riends Forever^ 



Studies in Nerve 

"Just think! He had the cheek to kiss me." 
'"You were furious, naturally?" 
"Yes — every time." 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

CIntissen f^aivr4»n4*e Constriiviion Co. 



BUILDERS OF THE 

SCHOOL STADIUM 



HenrV^iSSmnc.inc. 



AUGUSTA GA 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 
ANDREWS BROS. CO. 

DRY GOODS - LADIES" 
READY-TO-WEAR 



SOUTHERN WELDING 
COMPANY 

J. A. Ouzts, Proprietor 
Electric and Acetylene Welding 

Auto Axles Straightened Cold, 
Wheels Aligned Accurately 



623 Ellis Street 



Augusta, Ga. 



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The Jones Furniture Companij 

Euerythinq For The Home 

1010 Broad Street Phone 2365 




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COMPLIMENTS OF 

WOODWARD 

LUMBER CO. 

1010 Roberts St. Phone 1163 

Augusta. Ga. 



PRINTING- 

THAT WILL PLEASE YOLT 

LET WOLFE PRINT IT 

Phone 528 
Real Service 216-18 7th St. 



"Ik it's done with Hea' 
vou can do it better 

WITH GAS" 

GEORGIA PUBLIC UTILITIES CO. 



Always Tardy 
Father: "It's a good plan, my dear, always to think before you speik." 
Fooshe: "But, dad, when I do that the girls have changed the subject!" 

* * * * 

Wife: "Mother said she nearly died laughing at those funny stories you told her.' 
Mitchell: "Where is she? I know one that will finish her." 



GOOD DRUG STORES 

VISIT ANY ONE OF OUR CONVENIENT STORES 
"THERE IS ONE NEAR YOU" 



DRUGS 



CANDY 



CIGARS 



CIGARETTES 



GARDELLE'S 

Broad at the Monument Phone 366S 

LEWIS & OLIVE 

Broad at Tenth Phonel775 

KINGS WAY PHARMACY 

Central Avenue at Kings Way Phone 7678 

COLLEGE PHARMACY 

Walton W,-!y at Crawford Avenue Phone 3022 



KODAKS 



PERFUMES 



FOUNTS 



TOILETRIES 



ACCURACY PROMPT SERVICE QUALITY RELIABLE 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

J. B. WHITE S 
BEAUTY SHOP 

Manager, Mrs. Stella G. Leipold 



WITH BEST WISHES 

AUGUSTA LUMBER 
COMPANY 

LUMBER. MILLWORK AND 
BUILDER'S SUPPLIES 



U ^ V I 



L w A V y 



I 



SOUTH' S LARGEST SHOE STORE 






GoB 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



COLLINS BAKING CO. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



BARRETT FOOD CO. 



lieu? Spring 

Sport Suits 

For IJounq Illen 

Qfhe Qudliti^ Shop 



874 Broad Street 



The Farmer's Overhead 

Si: "I'd just love to be a farmer, to live with the blue sky overhead." 

Hi: "That would be all right if the blue sky were the farmer's only overhead." 



SHEEHAN STUDIO 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



722 BROAD ST. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



DYE'S FOOD Stores 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

BLANCHARD & CALHOUN 
REALTY COMPANY 

REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

AND INSURANCE 

MARION BLDG. AUGUSTA, GA. 



^: 



yHRooFiNG 6MetalWorks 



Irvcoi'pona-t «?cl 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



RELIABLE TRANSFER 



COMPANY 



LAND DRUG CO. 

BODEKER DRUG CO. 

(Successors) 

1202 Broad St. Courtesy Corner 

Prescription Specialist 

Expert Soda Fountain Service 

Cigars Drugs 

Cigarettes Drug Sundries 

Candy Cosmetics 

Courteous Service at All Times 



THE National life & Accident Ins. Co. 

27-28 JOHNSON BtHLDING 

W. E. J.-\KES, Mgr. O. D. Gorman, Supt. 

Jane E. Mixon, Cashier 

H. P. Odom H. a. Shurley 

^^^ a. Smith V. E. Hamm 

B. L. Jones G. H. Koon 

W. F. Adams J. G. Ransey 

W. A. Bennett Hill Sandeford 

TUNE IN WSM 
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 




Mn.YoutJas <jftteu>OY 





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COMPLIMENTS OF 

GENERAL TIRE AND 
SUPPLY CO. 

AUGUSTAS MASTER 
SERVICE STATION 

BROAD AT TWELFTH ST. 



UNDERWOOD ELLIOTT 
FISHER AGENCY 

TYPEWRITERS, ADDING 

MACHINES AND 

SUPPLIES 
n\'E REPAIR ALL MAKES" 

PIIOXE 4 017 22 6 EIGHTH ST. 

W. P,. BLACK. MGR. AUGUSTA. GA. 



Walker-Durant Motor Co., Inc. 




"The Car Without a Price Class" 

FORD AXU LINCOLN 
SALES -:- SERVICE 



BROAD AT FOURTEENTH ST. 



AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



"What is the difference between electricity and lightning?" the teacher asked. 

"You don't have to pay for lightning," came the prompt reply from Silver. 

* * * * 

"If you had eight pennies and lost three, how m"ny would you have left?" 

Little Levy thought for a minute. 

"But for vy," was his puzzled reply, "should I lose three pennies.?" 



ICE CREAM 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



GRADE AA MILK 
SELECTED 



Sanckenlr 

PASTEURIZED DAIRY 
PRODUCTS 

GEORGIA-CAROLINA DAIRIES 



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I Am Still Buj'ing Second-Hand 
BICYCLES 

CLYDE DUN AW AY 

Agent for Pierce-Arrow Bicycles 

215 12th Street Phone 3836 

Augusta, Georgia 



S. R. KELLY & SON 

MARBLE AND GRANITE 

MEMORIALS 



Phone 2129 



9th a Fenwick Sts. 



DRINK 




IN BOTTLES 
AUGUSTA COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 



COLLEGE CO-EB S COGITATIONS 



What man has done, woman feels 
qualified to improve upon. 

It may be true that eventually women 
will rule this country, but unless the 
stj'les become more modest, it will be by 
a Ijare majority. 

Indeed, some observant grammarian has 
remarked that "gradually the feminine 
gender is changing to the nuder gender." 

A modern novelist s^.ys "thirty is the 
proper age for a woman." Well, if she 
isn't proper by that time she probably 
never will be. 

If you see a woman moisten her lips 
while reading a novel, you n?ay know 
that the hero and heroine are about to 
kiss. 

For once, Oscar Wilde was right when 
he said: "Women are meant to be loved, 
not to be understood." 

A woman never really m-.kes a fool of 
a man. She just directs the performance. 

She is getting desperate when she be- 
gins to say that she thinks baldness is 
becoming to some men. 

When a girl gets to be thirty and is 
still unmarried, it is appearance, rather 
than wealth or position, that she prefers 
in a husband — -.nd the sooner he makes 



his appearance, the better. 

Cave women of the stone age did all 
their cooking with a single pot — which 
shows how we have progressed — their 
flat-dwelling sisters of the tin-can age 
need nothing but a can-opener. 

There are two ways in which a pretty 
woman can twist a m''.n around her little 
finger — and she knows them both. 

If you really wish to know a woman's 
bad points, praise her to another. 

To a woman, among all delightful 
sounds, the sweetest is the sound of 
somebody else doing the dishes 

There are two periods in a woman's 
life when she likes to tell how old she is 
— her first and second childhood. 

When a man says "I will," something 
ni-.y be done; but when a woman says "I 
will," something has got to be done. 

Etiquette Hint: If conversation lags, 
the hostess should ask her guests 
if an}' of them ever had an operation. 

The three most delightful feminine oc- 
cupations are, changing her clothes, her 
mind and — her name. 

A woman has two views of a secret. 
Either it's not worth keeping, or it's too 
good to keep. 

For anatomical rc.sons it is impossible 
for a woman to run as fast as a man. 
But die can think faster, and that's how 
she catches him! 



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LOANS 

$300.00 or Less 
20 Afoiiths to Re-pay 

FAMILY 

LOAN SOCIETY 

Xo. 11 Johnson H!f1-. 
PHONE 4,141 

LOANS 



Superior Laundry 

"All That the Name Implies' 
Phone 762 



GRADUATION AND 
GIFT BOOKS 

FOUNTAIN PENS KODAKS & FILMS 

Murphy Stationery 
Company 



DORRS 

"Good Taj;te Apparel" 

CLOTHIERS AND 
HABERDASHERS 



r20 BROAD ST. 



PHONE 1780 



r24 BROAD ST. 



AUGUSTA. GA. 



Time to Reflect 

Judge: "You'll have to prove your innocence." 
Prisoner: "Give me time," Judge." 
Judge: "OK — ten years." 



TASTE-RITE 

ICE CREAM 

Augusta Dairies 

1801 CENTRAL AVE. 

PHONE 7833-7832 



The Newest Style Clothing. Hats, 

and Furnishings for Men. Young 

Men and Students at Most 

POPULAR PRICES 

"If Meu Wear It. We Sell It" 

C. C. FARR A: CO. 



968 Broad St. 



Augusta, Ga. 



H. SHMERLING 

"Quality Made Us Famous, 
Serz'iee Made I's Grow" 

TRADE WITH AUGUSTA'S 
LEADING JEWELER 

910 Broad St. Phone 1101 

Augusta. Georgia 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

iai« ^. ^. 



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IN COMPLIMENT OF 

IMPERIAL. MODJESKA AND 
RIALTO 



VARSITY TOWN 

CLOTHES 

There Are No Finer— 
—FOR STYLE 
—FOR OUALITY 




COMPLIMENTS OF 
8. ALLEN COHEN 

District Manager 

THE MUTUAL LIFE IIVS. 
CO. OF N. Y. 

'Ninety Years of Service and Security" 



HEATH'S 

DRY CLEANiXG. PRESSIIVG. 
REMODELING 

312 Tackson St. Phone 9566 





rKlLLop 3poe6 





IDooB'wPiY "^ • 



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THE NONE SUCH 
RESTAURANT 

915 Bro, d Street 

Augusta's Most U p-to-Datc 
Eating House 

Reasonable Prices 

Gus A. SmaraRdis. Prop. 
Phone 171 



'Allburn Coal" 



"Crystal Ice" 



Patronize 

AUGUSTA 
ICE & COAI> CO. 

100% Home Industry 
Phone 145-146 630 13th Stfeet 



My Compliments and 
Best Wishes 

William Lyon Phelps 

YALE UNIVERSITY 




ilH^'^^milr1??^^£^W* 




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COMPLIMENTS 

SILVER FURNITURE 
COMPANY 

1208 Broad Street 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

BELL FINANCE CO. 

H. O. Tabb, Mgr. 

222-23 Masonic Bid?. 



STARK-EMPIRE 



Laundry - Cleaning - Dyeing 



Phone 1811 



Augusta, Ga. 



Dr. A. H. Meredith 
Dr. J. O. Baxter 



Phone 1675 



Meredith Optical Co. 

Optometrists & Opticians 
"Optical Service That Satisfies" 

7AQi-7A2 Broad St. Augusta, Ga. 



'In the Spring — tra-la-la 



'^ 



Love is a great life, if you don't 
waken. 

Love makes the world go round, but 
marriage keeps it on the square. 

Perhaps the only safe and certain way 
for a mr^.n to get rich quick is to marry 
a good woman. 

A }'Oung man's hardest problem is to 
find a girl attractive enough to please him, 
and dumb enough to like him. 

Courtship is the moonlight of love. 
Marriage is the electric light bill. 

You can't kiss a girl unexpectedly. The 
nearest you can come to it is to kiss 
her sooner than she thought you would. 

God made woman both beautiful and 
foolish — beautiful, that mao might love 
her; foolish, that she migh'. love him. 

Love levels all things but the head. 

The only two who can live as cheaply 
as one, are the flea and the dog. 

Courtship consists in a fellow running 
after a woman until she has caught him. 

A car parked on a lonely road is only 
two generations removed from the old 
parlor sofa. 

A few weeks after the elopement, the 
impetuous Benedict begins to wonder 
what the rush was about. 

Love is like a poker game: It takes a 
pair to open, she gets a flush, he shows 
diamonds, and it ends with a full house. 
_ A young fellow says his girl has an 
"impromptu" complexion. She makes it 
up as she goes along. 

BACHELOR: An unmarried man who 



has been singularly lucky in his love 
affairs. 

Some people "marry for love," while 
others just get married and live happily 
ever after. 

Love at first sight usually ends in di- 
vorce at first fight. 

Before marriage the man takes the girl 
to places. After marriage he goes with 
her. 

The love triangle generally turns out 
to be a wrecktangle. 

A spot of rouge on a man's mouth is 
the sticker he gets for parking too long 
in one place. 

The artistic application of face powder 
may catch a man, but it's the intelligent 
use of baking powder that keeps him 
caught. 

It must be awful when a girl discovers 
that the man after her own heart isn't 
after it at all. 

Many a girl is single today because she 
couldn't stay awake when some man 
talked about himself. 

The girl who marries a no-account fel- 
low, hoping to mend his ways, generally 
finds he isn't worth a darn. 

Before getting the knot tied the young 
couple who agree that they want to get 
married should take an inventory to see 
if there is anything else on which they 
can agree. 

Wedding Etiquette: It is bad form for 
the mother of the groom to cry louder 
than the mother of the bride. 



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ALL PRINTING COST 
ARE NOW THE SAME 



The Printing value you receive 
is determined solely by your 
choice of a printer and his- 

• ability 

• integrity 

• equipment 



Commercial Print|ing 

Company 

"IF ITS A PRINTED JOB ITS A COMMERCIAL JOB" 



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Roster of The Advertisers of The "Rainbow' 



ANDREW'S 

ATLANTIC GREYHOUND BUS 
AUGUSTA SPORTING GOODS 
AUGUSTA OPTICAL CO. 
AUGUSTA ICE AND COAL CO. 
AUGUSTA LUMBER CO. 
AUGUSTA ROOFING & METAL 

WORKS 
AUGUSTA DAIRIES 
AUGUSTA GARAGE 
BAILIE FURNITURE CO. 
BARRETT FOOD CO. 
BELL FINANCE CO. 
BLANCHARD & CALHOUN 
BOSTON HATTERS 
BOWEN BROS. HARDWARE 
CENTRAL DRY CLEANERS 
CENTRAL GARDENS 
CLAUSSEN LAWRENCE CON- 

STRITCTION CO, 
CLYDE DUNAWAY BICYCLES 
COLLINS BAKERY 
CITIZENS & SOUTHERN BANK 
A. COHEN— LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

OF NEW YORK 
COLLEGE PHARMACY 
COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING CO. 
DORR'S 

DYE'S FOOD STORES 
R. E. ELLIOTT & SONS 
FAMILY LOAN SOCIETY 
C. C. FARR 

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